IoT
IoT
Infrastructure // PC & Servers
News
1/12/2016
11:36 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
Core System Testing: How to Achieve Success
Oct 06, 2016
Property and Casualty Insurers have been investing in modernizing their core systems to provide fl ...Read More>>

Microsoft Kills Support For Internet Explorer 8, 9, 10

With the end of support for Internet Explorer 8, 9 and 10, most people using an older version of Microsoft's browser are forced to upgrade, switch browsers, or put their systems at risk.

Microsoft's 2016: More Windows 10, Hardware Advances, Research Gains
Microsoft's 2016: More Windows 10, Hardware Advances, Research Gains
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Microsoft is officially terminating support for Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9 and 10, effective today, Jan. 12. If you're still running a version of Internet Explorer older than IE 11, it's time to upgrade or switch to a new browser.

"End of support means there will be no more security updates, non-security updates, free or paid assisted support options, or online technical content updates," wrote officials on Microsoft's support page.

You can still use the older versions of Internet Explorer, but you'll be putting your system at risk. Should the browser security become compromised (it's only a matter of time), Microsoft will not provide the patch to fix it.

[The Windows 10 laptops and hybrids we tried at CES 2016.]

IE 11, the most recent and final version of the browser, will continue to receive security updates, technical support and compatibility fixes for Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10, Microsoft reports. An upgrade to IE 11 also brings better performance and backward compatibility, as well as support for today's Web standards, the company says.

Jan. 12 is the last day security updates will roll out to older editions of IE. This could create a headache for businesses running apps designed to work on older browsers. Fortunately, some users have more time to upgrade.

If you have Windows Vista, certain versions of Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2012, or certain versions of the Windows Embedded OS, Microsoft will continue supporting Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9, or 10, depending on which version of the system is in use. Those running Window Server 2008 SP2, for example, can run IE 9; Windows Server 2012 will support IE 10.

However, Microsoft is urging those using Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 2012 R2, and other versions of Windows Embedded to upgrade their browsers to IE 11 by Jan. 13 in order to safeguard their systems.

There is also the option to switch to Microsoft Edge, the minimalist browser launched as part of Windows 10 during the summer of 2015. The new browser, a major sign Microsoft was stepping away from IE, brings added security, Cortana integration, greater speed, a built-in reading list, and the ability to mark up Web pages with a digital pen.

The problem is, Edge is only available on Windows 10. Microsoft's new OS may be on 200 million devices, but most businesses will take longer to upgrade their systems.

(Image: Wikimedia Commons)

(Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Today's end-of-support affects a massive chunk of the online population. Although Internet Explorer's desktop share dropped 8.81% between Feb. 2015 and Dec. 2015, as indicated by NetMarketShare data, 48.57% of desktops were still running the browser in December. This puts IE well ahead of Chrome, the next-most-popular browser, which had 32.33% of the market.

Further, as of Dec. 2015, 42.5% of all users running Internet Explorer were using a version of the browser set to expire today. This amounts to about 339.2 million users, estimated ComputerWorld, which took into account the 1.5 billion Windows devices used around the globe.

That's a lot of people who will find themselves exposed to cyber-attacks if they don't take action, but the end-of-support for IE shouldn't come as a surprise.

Microsoft first announced today's deadline back in Aug. 2014. The tech giant forewarned users it would terminate support for all versions of Internet Explorer, save for the most recent iteration, on Jan. 12, 2016.

**Elite 100 2016: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JAN. 15, 2016** There's still time to be a part of the prestigious InformationWeek Elite 100! Submit your company's application by Jan. 15, 2016. You'll find instructions and a submission form here: InformationWeek's Elite 100 2016.

Kelly is an associate editor for InformationWeek. She most recently reported on financial tech for Insurance & Technology, before which she was a staff writer for InformationWeek and InformationWeek Education. When she's not catching up on the latest in tech, Kelly enjoys ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
1/21/2016 | 8:23:38 PM
Re: The Edge

@Todder  @Whoopty   I probably won't be using Edge for anything extensive - I'll stick with Firefox and Chrome even though it is a resource hog and I love to keep many tabs open.

Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
1/21/2016 | 8:19:17 PM
Re: The Edge

@mak63    Thanks for the information and tip !

SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
1/15/2016 | 8:09:05 AM
Re: The Edge
I'm trying not to pile on Edge here but I tried it for a couple weeks because I have a handful of IE only sites that I have to use regularly. Let me just say it's really frustrating that Edge behaves worse with those "best viewed with IE" sites than Chrome or Firefox.  Luckily IE has been good about compatibility mode so web devs can keep using ancient plugins so ending support on old versions of IE doesn't hurt like it used to. 
mak63
50%
50%
mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
1/13/2016 | 7:17:21 PM
Re: The Edge
@Whoopty You would think coming with Win 10, Edge would handle the memory usage a little better. But, no, not really. As bad as the rest of the other browsers. Surprisingly, Firefox is the best of the three in this regard.
Todder
50%
50%
Todder,
User Rank: Moderator
1/13/2016 | 12:15:04 PM
Re: The Edge
Folks in my organization haven't found anything compelling about Edge. Also, if you develop and run multi-platform software that has a web ui requirement FF and Chrome are better options.
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
1/13/2016 | 7:10:42 AM
Re: The Edge
I really should give Edge a shot, but it feels strange ot even consider using a Microsoft browser after so many years of Chrome and Firefox usage. What's Edge's memory usage like? That's my one complaint with Chrome is that it sucks up so many system resources.
mak63
50%
50%
mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
1/12/2016 | 11:04:44 PM
Re: The Edge
Edge is a fast little browser. A work in progress though. It has nice features, but also lacks some.
You could you use a virtual enviroment in Server 2008 to check WIndows 10 and Edge.
Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
1/12/2016 | 1:49:33 PM
Windows 2008 and IE 11

"....Microsoft is urging those using Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 2012 R2, and other versions of Windows Embedded to upgrade their browsers to IE 11 by Jan. 13 in order to safeguard their systems."

As someone who has a Windows 2008 server in use.  This is very useful information.

 

Thanks !

Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
1/12/2016 | 1:05:03 PM
The Edge

At first glance I thought Microsoft was giving up the browser altogether.   I am interested to see the Edge. 

Is it a new design completely ?   Sounds like it.

Server Market Splitsville
Server Market Splitsville
Just because the server market's in the doldrums doesn't mean innovation has ceased. Far from it -- server technology is enjoying the biggest renaissance since the dawn of x86 systems. But the primary driver is now service providers, not enterprises.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
Top IT Trends to Watch in Financial Services
IT pros at banks, investment houses, insurance companies, and other financial services organizations are focused on a range of issues, from peer-to-peer lending to cybersecurity to performance, agility, and compliance. It all matters.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.