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Cloud, Mobile And Analytics Lessons From The IW 500

The InformationWeek 500 research shows doubts about hybrid clouds, sentiment analytics and mobile apps for employees.

Analytics: Just Getting Started

Managers at most IW 500 companies use analytics tools to monitor operations, but it's still early days for the next wave: predictive analytics and widespread employee use.

For example, 72% of IW 500 companies are monitoring revenue daily or more frequently, and another 13% are testing or will roll out such a capability within a year. Fifty-seven percent of companies provide dashboards to 20% or more of their employees to monitor key metrics; just 10% have no plans to do so. So daily monitoring and manager dashboards have become standard practice.

More cutting-edge analytics work involves giving dashboards to a majority of employees. Just 29% of companies do that; 35% are testing or planning to roll out those dashboards within a year; and 36% have no plans. Likewise, 47% of IW 500 companies allow end user what-if analysis with no IT involvement, and another 37% are in testing or plan to roll it out. Enabling such what-if analysis shows IT moving away from simple report building and toward facilitating creative thinking.

Predictive analysis isn't widely adopted. Just 54% of IW 500 companies do predictive revenue analysis, though another 19% plan to within a year.

One of the biggest question marks is whether sentiment analytics -- analyzing social data to assess what people are saying about brands and products -- will prove critical. Just a third of IW 500 companies use sentiment analytics tools today, but another fifth are testing them and 17% plan to use them within a year. Almost 30% have no such plans. Sentiment analytics is becoming essential for consumer goods companies, but for business-to-business companies it's a tougher sell.

Mobile: No Great Rush

How They Are Chosen
The InformationWeek 500 recognizes business technology teams that have made a demonstrable impact on how their organizations do business. It's open to companies with ­revenue of $250 million or more. Companies complete a rigorous application on their technology strategies, and a panel of InformationWeek editors determine the ranking by factoring in quantitative and qualitative factors.

For 2014, InformationWeek will shift to an even more exclusive spotlight for true innovators with what we're calling the InformationWeek Elite 100. The application period opens in October, and you can pre­register here .

Send questions to iwelite100@ubm.com.

Someone forgot to tell most IW 500 companies that we're in the midst of a mobile revolution. Our company profiles do include creative uses of mobile apps -- what General Motors is doing to integrate iPads into its dealer sales process, for example, or how satellite TV company Dish has moved its in-home service technicians onto an oversized "phablet" style Samsung smartphone. But our data shows that a majority of IW 500 companies are going mobile at a more relaxed pace.

Forty-two percent have widely deployed mobile apps for customers, up a respectable five points from a year ago but still short of a majority. Just 30% of IW 500 companies have widely deployed mobile apps for employees, with another 30% in limited deployment -- both percentages little changed from a year ago. There are even some signs of mobile cooling off. A year ago, 38% of companies said that broader deployment of tablets was one of the top ways they boosted productivity; this year, it's just 30%. (In comparison, 50% said they're deploying analytics more broadly, up from 43% a year ago.)

Will IT organizations have the money to move forward with their grand plans? Sixty percent of companies expect 2013 IT spending to increase from 2012 levels, 28% said it would hold steady, and just 12% said it would decline. Last year, 68% expected their IT spending to increase.

All these numbers are cold comfort for IT leaders. For every data point that says companies are easing up on tablet expansion, for instance, there's a story of factory workers or salespeople using tablets to improve productivity. Whether it's cloud, analytics, mobile or some other emerging tech, the leaders who apply for the IW 500 aren't just trying to stay ahead of the average; they're trying to get ahead of the best.

chart: Have you rolled out these tech strategies?

Go to the InformationWeek 500 - 2013 homepage

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WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
9/17/2013 | 12:26:45 PM
re: Cloud, Mobile And Analytics Lessons From The IW 500
I think the finding on tablets --A year ago, 38% of companies said that broader
deployment of tablets was one of the top ways they boosted productivity;
this year, it's just 30%-- squares with the fact that tablets look liberating for workers, but still remain much better at consuming, or updating information, than they are for executing much of the work most workers still have to do and which is easier to accomplish w/ a laptop or PC.
OtherJimDonahue
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OtherJimDonahue,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 9:53:25 PM
re: Cloud, Mobile And Analytics Lessons From The IW 500
"Sixty percent of companies expect 2013 IT
spending to increase from 2012 levels, 28% said it would hold steady,
and just 12% said it would decline. Last year, 68% expected their IT
spending to increase."

That's interesting. I wonder of the 68% who expected IT spending to increase last year, how many really had an increase?
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
9/9/2013 | 6:49:58 PM
re: Cloud, Mobile And Analytics Lessons From The IW 500
Only 42% of IW 500 companies (and these are the business technology leaders) have widely deployed mobile apps for customers. It's very surprising that percentage isn't much higher, for B2B companies as well as B2C. There needs to be a greater sense of urgency to go mobile.
Google in the Enterprise Survey
Google in the Enterprise Survey
There's no doubt Google has made headway into businesses: Just 28 percent discourage or ban use of its productivity ≠products, and 69 percent cite Google Apps' good or excellent ≠mobility. But progress could still stall: 59 percent of nonusers ≠distrust the security of Google's cloud. Its data privacy is an open question, and 37 percent worry about integration.
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