Strategic CIO // Executive Insights & Innovation
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6/8/2010
02:10 PM
Chris Murphy
Chris Murphy
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These Private Cloud Stats Surprised Me

We've heard plenty of worries about public cloud computing, so I wasn't shocked that just over 63% of companies have no plans for it, in our recent survey. But I was surprised at the level of interest in private clouds: 58% are using or plan to use this architecture.

We've heard plenty of worries about public cloud computing, so I wasn't shocked that just over 63% of companies have no plans for it, in our recent survey. But I was surprised at the level of interest in private clouds: 58% are using or plan to use this architecture.This week's InformationWeek cover story focuses on private clouds, with original research that provides a reality check to this much-discussed topic. That 58% is one dose of reality. But there's a counterweight: Very few companies are spending big money on private clouds. In fact, 38% of those using or with plans having zero budget for it. Another third spend 10% or less of their IT budget on private clouds. But budgets for private clouds are expected to rise notably the next 18 months, our research finds.

In the article, contributor Michael Biddick discusses the obstacles to private clouds, and the steps needed to build them. Writes Biddick:

Business technology teams should expect to find plenty of fragmented products, and they'll likely struggle to put all of the pieces together to create a true elastic, on-demand private cloud. However, many of the steps you should be taking to run a better data center--like increased automation and consolidation--will help lay the groundwork for private clouds.

Also in this week's issue, we look at the case for WAN optimization, Fritz Nelson digs into IT's role in running a baseball team, and the Secret CIO column returns.

Download the PDF of the full issue here.

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