3D Printing Robot Will Build An Entire Bridge - InformationWeek
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3D Printing Robot Will Build An Entire Bridge

In a move that takes 3D printers into the real world, a 3D printing robot will make a bridge over a canal in Amsterdam.

Disney's Tomorrowland Past And Present: A Celebration
Disney's Tomorrowland Past And Present: A Celebration
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Paul Simon broke it off with Art Garfunkel and went solo, but soon I expect he could start singing Bridge Over Troubled Waters with this robot from MX3D. The robot, without any need for temporary supports or humans, will build a 24-foot long pedestrian bridge across a canal in Amsterdam.

If all goes according to plan it could usher in an exciting new era of 3D-printed infrastructure.

As seen in this video, MX3D has been experimenting with what is essentially "drawing in midair" with an additive printing technique that gets rid of the printer bed we're used to seeing with 3D printers.

The robot is basically a multi-axis industrial robot outfitted with a 3D printing arm.

It will literally cross the bridge as it builds it -- inching across it on the rails it just finished printing. The bridge will be designed in a new Autodesk software that not only allows the robot to understand, visualize, and print the designed bridge, but it can also adapt to the final location (which hasn't been chosen yet).

Here is a visualization of the planned project:

Assuming the project succeeds and can stand the test of time, this really ushers in the potential for a change in the way we build infrastructure products.

The two months of expected construction time is competitive. After a conversation with several engineers, I was unable to get any to commit to a time frame regarding how long it might take to design and build a pedestrian bridge like this. All said that it depends on the location, materials, and a myriad of environmental issues and details. But all agreed that the construction time was generally competitive for specifically designed bridges -- as opposed to pre-fab. And the expectation is that we can reduce construction time with more experience.

(Image: MX3D)

(Image: MX3D)

If you can assume we can build a pedestrian bridge, eventually you can imagine a group of these robots building bridges for cars. And what is a bridge except the skeleton of a building turned on its side? Why not robots that build houses or even skyscrapers from the ground up in gravity-defying maneuvers? Robots are tireless workers that can work in any weather, barring conditions that would limit the building process itself. While slower than a human, they can work for 24 hours with no safety equipment, no fear of death, and with perhaps less environmental impact.

[And here are some other things robots do that we love. Read Robots: We Love the Crazy Things They Do.]

In other words, we have a possibility of replacing all of our major construction in the world with robots equipped with 3D printers.

The designer of the bridge, Joris Laarman, said on the MX3D site, "This bridge will show how 3D printing finally enters the world of large-scale, functional objects and sustainable materials, while allowing unprecedented freedom of form. The symbolism of the bridge is a beautiful metaphor to connect the technology of the future with the old city in a way that brings out the best of both worlds."

I'm not sure I see the "beautiful metaphor," but I do see beautiful potential, especially living in the Bay Area where we recently built a bridge which was billions over budget and years behind schedule.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

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nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/7/2015 | 10:11:33 AM
Re: 3D
@Ariella I think David has rightly pointed out the basic propertieds of Graphene. I have the same opinion after confirming it with little bit of more depth. Presently the use of graphene is the lack of expertise as well as the high cost. I hope in future we can see more use of Graphene as a stronger material. Lets wait and see.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
6/23/2015 | 11:16:08 AM
Re: 3D
@David exactly so, graphene has amazing properties and applications.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
6/23/2015 | 10:55:47 AM
Re: 3D
@Ariella I am not sure that it is called graphene but I believe that you must be right. I will check it again and get back with answer of your query  :)
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
6/20/2015 | 5:49:01 PM
Re: Jobs
I wouldn't be surprise of that either.  At least the change won't be that drastic that will give people a chance to adapt to the new job market before the robots take over our jobs.  Seriously, who wants to clean windows on a skyscraper, which is a really dangerous job.  Who wants to work on a  mine where many miners suffer from lung disease.   let the robots take care of these dangerous jobs.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/17/2015 | 12:43:04 PM
Re: 3D
@sachinee- Yes, and lead is highly toxic. But I think nomii means graphene which is not actually quite the same thing as graphite which is what we use in pencils today. 

Graphene is 200 times stronger than steel and is very lightweight and thin. It can be made only an atom thick and maintain quite a lot of strength. The issue with using graphene in materials right now is price. But even if price is taken care of, using graphene in buildings has an interesting problem. Pure graphene is very brittle. When i tbreaks, it shatters like glass. So you could build a strong building out of it, but if a force broke the graphene, the whole building would crumble.

We need to essentially create graphene alloys to make it work which is a whole new level of material science. You need something which bends and flexes under pressure but also has the strength. This, by the way, is one of the reasons why we invented steel over iron. Most early iron methods made very brittle objects, too. 
GAProgrammer
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GAProgrammer,
User Rank: Ninja
6/17/2015 | 12:34:19 PM
Re: 3D
@Gary_El - actually, 3D printing metals has been around for years - look up "sintering". When I first heard of 3D printing about 5 years ago, we talked about this at my job and this already exists. However, the technology is limited to which metals can be used, just as most 3D printers use some type of plastic or resin.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
6/17/2015 | 10:54:45 AM
Re: Jobs
I think after 100 years, only the robot maintainer will remain as a job category or even worse, human become the slave of their creation.:-)
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
6/17/2015 | 8:59:23 AM
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Author
6/17/2015 | 8:56:55 AM
Re: 3D
@nomii I think you mean graphene. 
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
6/17/2015 | 6:19:36 AM
Jobs
As much as I am very excited about this sort of automation, it's a very clear indicator of how jobs are going to disappear in many traditional sectors in the near future. It's not just the more working class professions though. While construction will gradually fall by the wayside as smarter robots are introduced, pilots will go too - even more so than they have now - and so will surgeons to a point. 

Will there be any jobs left in 100 years time? Or will we all be living lives of leisure?

 
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