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Microsoft Repatches Third August Patch

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Consumer Tech In IT? Why Not?
2. Today's Top Story
    - Microsoft Repatches Third August Patch
    Related Stories:
    - Microsoft Accused Of Not Sharing PowerPoint Exploit Info
    - Microsoft Upgrades Data Protection Manager
3. Breaking News
    - Open Source Database Gets An Oracle Upgrade
    - Judge Dismisses Much Of AMD's Antitrust Lawsuit Against Intel
    - CA Adds Configuration Management Database
    - Intel 'Clearly Executing,' Analyst Says
    - Microsoft Hammers Out Office 2007 Delivery Plans
    - IBM, Intel Propose PCI Express Enhancements
    - CA Offers Insurance To Security Suite Customers
    - Demo Attendees Pitch New Uses For Camera Phones
    - More Than 75,000 Sign Up For Wireless Internet Sites
    - Lenovo Ships First AMD-Based Desktop PC
    - Interview: Malcolm Yates Of Ubuntu Linux Vendor Canonical
    - Challenges Ahead For Embedded Sector, Experts Say
4. Grab Bag
    - 'Tower Of Babel' Technology Nears (BBC News)
    - Blog: For A New Business Model To Work, It Probably Shouldn't Annoy Users (Techdirt)
    - Education At Hand (Baltimore Sun)
5. In Depth: Powering Up
    - Google, Intel Call For Vastly More Efficient PC Power Supplies
    - Despite PC Drama, New Battery Tech Still Years Away
    - Review: Atlas Power Supply Succeeds
    - Review: Antec TruePower Trio 650 Power Supply
    - Google Goes Its Own Way In The Data Center
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Intel Finds Energy Efficiency Religion
7. White Papers
    - Vehicle-Maintenance Software: What To Look For
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"I don't say we all ought to misbehave. But we ought to look as if we could." -- Oscar Wilde


1. Editor's Note: Consumer Tech In IT? Why Not?

Now that the technology sector is apparently growing steadily again, at least according to a new study by the American Electronics Association, we can all turn to the task at hand: incorporating more types of consumer technologies into corporate computing.

The news coming out of this week's Demo conference will help on this score. As usual, the Demo stuff is pretty cool, but this year it's because many of the upstarts are really beginning to marry the corporate and consumer worlds. Koral, for one, is a content management vendor pitching itself as a Wikipedia for corporate information; the idea is to help employees collaborate more quickly and efficiently.

Another, Dash Navigation, is a hands-free navigation system with a twist: Not only does it send you updated traffic data for your current location, it uploads the information to anyone at the office who may need to know you're stuck on the road. The down side: no more 'white lies' about why we're late to meetings.

A third, Pluggd's HearHere, is a search tool for audio and video that uses speech and image recognition to find the reference you're looking for.

Another example of consumer technology in the business world is using online chat as a way of solving computer-related problems more quickly. While this may not be on the wish list of IT pros who might not be so receptive to the idea of yet another type of "instant interruption," almost 70% of the business users responding to a new survey said this would be a swell idea because it would be faster and easier than using the phone.

This notion of consumer-meets-corporate is not new, of course. An InformationWeek cover story from March talked about how companies can tap into the energy of consumer technologies from MP3 players to cell phones. Mostly this hasn't happened; security concerns and tightened IT budgets, not to mention good-old-fashioned fear of the unknown, have conspired against this.

But the wall between the two is starting to crack, and I believe it will crumble altogether within a decade or so.

And speaking of consumer and corporate worlds colliding, Microsoft's new social networking spin-off has launched. Wallop is invitation-only, though, and maybe I'm missing something here, but isn't that antithetical to the notion of a "social network"? I realize the company may be trying to borrow what's been a successful marketing tack from Google, but the Gmail ship has long sailed. And especially given how Wallop is trying to sell graphics and other features that people can use to decorate their personal profile pages, similar to virtual worlds, the invite-only notion seems a bit stifling.

This is in direct contrast to Facebook's newest ploy, which is to invite everyone. As my colleague Keith Ferrell muses in a recent blog entry: "Are social networking sites open, broad-based personal communication places, or are they more like country clubs with restricted membership lists?"

What do you think? Will Wallop pack a punch anyway, and what about the notion of consumer tech in IT? Do you see a place for it in your own shop? Weigh in at my blog entry.

Johanna Ambrosio
jambrosio@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Microsoft Repatches Third August Patch
The new patch fixes a bug that could trash NTFS file systems when using Microsoft's own compression software. It's the third patch from August's batch that had to be reissued.

Related Stories:

Microsoft Accused Of Not Sharing PowerPoint Exploit Info
A security researcher says Microsoft may have withheld information on a new unpatched vulnerability in PowerPoint. It's not the first time Microsoft and security rivals have clashed.

Microsoft Upgrades Data Protection Manager
Version 2 of DPM, as the software is known, now offers a more granular approach to continuous data protection, as well as increased security for information in Microsoft applications such as Exchange, SQL, and SharePoint, the company promises.


3. Breaking News

Open Source Database Gets An Oracle Upgrade
Berkeley DB, the open source database system frequently used in Linux applications, can now be patched while it's still running.

Judge Dismisses Much Of AMD's Antitrust Lawsuit Against Intel
A federal judge ruled that claims that Intel engaged in misconduct overseas fell outside the jurisdiction of U.S. law.

CA Adds Configuration Management Database
The database includes more than 70 relationship templates, 140 predefined configuration item groups, and multiple adapters for integrating the collected information.

Intel 'Clearly Executing,' Analyst Says
Insight 64's Nathan Brookwood, who has not been a big fan of Intel's competitiveness in the recent past, says the company is well on its way to righting the ship.

Microsoft Hammers Out Office 2007 Delivery Plans
The Office client-side suites may mimic Vista in that all bits may ship on one DVD. Customers can "turn on" higher-level and pricier versions with a key.

IBM, Intel Propose PCI Express Enhancements
"Geneseo" outlines new features that are said to enable faster connectivity in a system. Applications that could benefit include visualization, data intensive financial applications, and content processing, according to backers.

CA Offers Insurance To Security Suite Customers
Customers in all states except New York receive up to $5,000 in identity theft coverage when they buy Internet Security Suite 2007 through a reseller or directly, a CA spokesman said.

Demo Attendees Pitch New Uses For Camera Phones
Document scanning and photo personalization are among the new wares being pushed at this week's show.

More Than 75,000 Sign Up For Wireless Internet Sites
More than 100 countries were represented among the registrants for the ".mobi" extensions, with the United States, Canada, and China acquiring the most domain names.

Lenovo Ships First AMD-Based Desktop PC
Starting at a list price of $599, the system can be configured with 4 Gbytes of DDR2 memory and a 250-Gbyte hard drive, and it can support a 500-Gbyte hard drive.

Interview: Malcolm Yates Of Ubuntu Linux Vendor Canonical
The company behind Ubuntu, one of the fastest-growing Linux distros, is moving from small-business users to enterprise deployment.

Challenges Ahead For Embedded Sector, Experts Say
One recent survey found that more than a third of all embedded projects are late and nearly 13% are canceled.

All Our Latest News


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4. Grab Bag

'Tower Of Babel' Technology Nears (BBC News)
The problem of compatibility between wireless devices is being addressed at an international conference this week. Software-defined radio can read and understand different kinds of radio waves, including 3G and Wi-Fi.

Blog: For A New Business Model To Work, It Probably Shouldn't Annoy Users (Techdirt)
One observer's take on an announcement at Demo about how to add commercials at the end of songs on both computers and mobile devices, regardless of whether the music is legal or pirated.

Education At Hand (Baltimore Sun)
If they miss this morning's introductory biology lecture, Johns Hopkins University students can still catch it this afternoon--at the lacrosse field, on the light rail, even in bed.


5. In Depth: Powering Up

Google, Intel Call For Vastly More Efficient PC Power Supplies
Google says it's increased the efficiency of power supplies from 60% or 70% to 90%, and the same efficiency is within reach for consumer PCs.

Despite PC Drama, New Battery Tech Still Years Away
It's going to take five or more years to develop technology that satisfies all the requirements to be light, small, durable, and "relatively safe," in the words of one industry watcher.

Review: Atlas Power Supply Succeeds
In CRN's test, the Atlas-50GA didn't overheat at peak power consumption with either an Intel or an Advanced Micro Devices motherboard and with two different power configurations.

Review: Antec TruePower Trio 650 Power Supply
If your system is bristling with hard drives and other devices, then you'll need enough power to support them. Antec's latest power supply may be useful.

Google Goes Its Own Way In The Data Center
With patents on cooling baffles and fan mounts, its next big step is hydropowered electricity.


6. Voice Of Authority

Intel Finds Energy Efficiency Religion
It may not have been as dramatic as Saul's Road to Damascus conversion, but getting hit upside the head by rival Advanced Micro Devices the past two years must have helped Intel see the light, Darrell Dunn suggests. Now Intel has belatedly become a full convert to the religion of energy efficiency.


7. White Papers

Vehicle-Maintenance Software: What To Look For
When it comes to scheduling and performing preventive maintenance on their vehicle fleets, organizations have two choices: network-based and Web-based. Both share many of the same benefits. This paper tells you how to decide.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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