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2/15/2006
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Microsoft Resolves Security Patch Install Glitch

Shortly after rolling out seven security bulletins Tuesday, Microsoft reported that one of the patches would not install, forcing users to download the fix manually. By Wednesday, the problem had been solved.

Shortly after rolling out seven security bulletins Tuesday, Microsoft reported that one of the patches would not install, forcing users to download the fix manually. By Wednesday, the problem had been solved.

The affected bulletin, dubbed MS06-007, fixes a TCP/IP vulnerability that could let hackers launch denial-of-service (DoS) against most versions of Windows. It was one of five bulletins marked "important," which is Microsoft's second most serious ranking in its four-step system.

However, almost immediately after Microsoft released the seven fixes, users began reporting that MS06-007 wouldn't install using Microsoft Update, Windows Update, Automatic Updates, Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), and Systems Management Server 2003 when using the Inventory Tool for Microsoft Updates.

Until late Tuesday, the only way Windows users could install the patch was to manually download it from Microsoft's Download Center.

Microsoft has since solved the problem, Stephen Toulouse, the program manager of Microsoft's Security Response Center, noted on the response center's blog. "This situation is now resolved and customers should be able to get the update," Toulouse wrote. "I want to reiterate that the problem had nothing to do with the update itself, you applied it manually from the download center or got it through SUS 1.0 it should install correctly and protect against the vulnerability. But it’s available now for everyone."

Toulouse added that a short-term fix has been applied to help Microsoft catch future repeats of the problem, but that the company will change its patch publishing process to completely eliminate the problem.

This isn't the first time that glitches have struck Microsoft's developer patches. In December 2005, Microsoft's Software Update Service (SUS) server software unintentionally rolled back previously "approved" updates to "unapproved" status, requiring the company to release a special tool to fix confused systems.

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