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5/15/2014
04:06 PM
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FCC 'Open' Internet May Mean 'Paid'

Federal Communications Commission votes to consider broadband rules that could allow data fast lanes. Public invited to comment.

Image: AOL
Image: AOL

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Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/15/2014 | 8:49:43 PM
Re: Mozilla's compromise
If less than 10 internet companies are currently accounting for 80% of internet's traffic, then shouldn't the internet to open to monetization, because I feel that these 10 or so companies do not represent 80% of the value that the internet creates. Opening it up to monetization should (at least in theory) make them pay for 80% of the internet.
Thomas Claburn
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50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
5/15/2014 | 5:51:30 PM
Re: "Open Internet"??
There's a lot of that going around. Mozilla, which says its mission is to defend the "open Internet," has just agreed to support DRM in Firefox. I would humbly suggest that anyone using the word "open" be required to write it thus: "open(*)"
GlenW218
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GlenW218,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/15/2014 | 5:08:40 PM
Re: Mozilla's compromise
I like Mozilla Proposal, it is what I'm been arguing for weeks.  A lot of people disagree with me.  It makes sense when less than 10 internet companies make up more than 80% of the internet traffic.
anon1471712903
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0%
anon1471712903,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/15/2014 | 4:59:24 PM
"Open Internet"??
Don't you just love how government names things?  That way they can get all the support they need from lazy thinkers who just read the title.  "Open Internet?   Oh sure, I'm for that.   Everybody should be for an open internet."

 

I can assure you that when you appoint a cable lobbiest head of the FCC that the end result will be anything *BUT* and open internet.
CMyers
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CMyers,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/15/2014 | 4:57:48 PM
Re: Mozilla's compromise
That would probably work, because traffic on the downstream-to-consumer side can be disguised with a VPN if it starts getting throttled.  If they're allowed to manipulate the upstream-to-network side, they will shut down any services that get popular enough to make a dent in the bandwidth, with tolls precisely calculated to make them uncompetitive.
Laurianne
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0%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/15/2014 | 4:26:17 PM
Mozilla's compromise
What do you think of Mozilla's proposal, readers? A smart step or not enough?
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