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4/2/2012
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8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta

Can't wait until the new Windows 8 tablets are released in the fall? These currently available tablets can handle the beta version of the OS now.
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Windows 8 tablets reportedly won't be available until October, but that doesn't mean you have to wait until Halloween to start using Microsoft's new touch-based operating system. The company has already released Windows 8 Consumer Preview, which provides a pretty close approximation of what the final version of the OS will look and feel like.

Best of all, Windows 8 Consumer Preview is free to download, and it will run on a number of existing Windows 7 tablets, eight of which we present here for your consideration. But before you download Windows 8 CP and run out and buy tablet, there are a few important things you should know. The most basic is the system requirements: To run Windows 8 CP comfortably, Microsoft recommends a system with at least a 1 GHz processor, 1 GB of RAM, 16 GB of storage, and Directx 9 graphics, with WDDM 1.0 or higher drivers.

If you want to experience Windows 8's Metro interface on a touch tablet, your device needs a display capable of handling resolution of at least 1024 pixels x 768 pixels. All the devices in our gallery boast screens with at least that capability. To use Metro's Snap feature, which lets you pin a Metro app to the desktop, resolution must be at least 1366 x 768.

Another important point: While existing tablets running Windows 8 Consumer Preview will give you a pretty good sense of the Windows 8 experience, this fall's new tablets, whether they're running Intel chips or ARM-based processors, will be built specifically with Windows 8 in mind.

Those tablets, from manufacturers like ASUS, HP, Lenovo, and Dell, will deliver a Windows 8 touch experience that's superior to the one Windows 7 tablets can achieve. Microsoft has worked with hardware OEMs to ensure that Windows 8 tablets deliver touch performance that is consistent across all parts of the screen, from edge to edge. That's important because Windows 8 has features, like the Charms bar, that can be accessed only by swiping the edge of the display.

Also, Windows 8-specific tablets are no longer hindered by the 20-pixel barrier around the edges that's unavailable to apps on Windows 7 tablets. Microsoft says it has found a way make the entire tablet display available to app makers while ensuring that utilities that live on the screen edge remain highly responsive to touch.

Finally, keep in mind that the Windows 8 tablets that debut in the fall will likely be much less expensive than most of those shown here. Microsoft needs to grab tablet market share, so the company will likely be quite aggressive on price in order to get it. But if you absolutely can't wait, here's a look at eight tablets that can run Windows 8 right now.

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trector300
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trector300,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2012 | 5:52:59 PM
re: 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta
Is this a joke? Except for one, all of these tablets are more expensive than an iPad (and most are SIGNIFICANTLY more expensive!) Ridiculous.
mark_avo
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mark_avo,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2012 | 6:23:00 PM
re: 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta
Where as I'll agree that the iPad is less expensive than most iterations on here Windows 8 supports multiple accounts, Active Directory integration and has a fully fledged operating system under the hood.

Now, past that nonsense of price, if Microsoft can't get sub $500 tablets they're in trouble based on common misconceptions about what a tablet "can" potentially do vs. currently does(n't).

Also, some corrections for the article. If the tablet doesn't have a MINIMUM resolution of 1366x768 then Metro "snap" willl not work (metro apps side by side in horizontal display).

That means that really only TWO of the tablets mentioned in the article are even viable candidates to run the beta on: (Dell Inspiron Duo, Samsung Series 7)
herman_munster
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herman_munster,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2012 | 8:21:27 PM
re: 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta
I guess the range of tablets offered by Motion Computing didn't make this list for some logical reason. I would have thought that they would have been the first ones mentioned but to be fair, I'm not really one who would consider machines from the same old track-horses such as Dell and HP.

I did rather like the design of the HP Slate 2 and that Samsung rig. The one thing that really holds me back from making any investment in such hardware, though, is my uncertainty that the hardware will be sufficient enough to actually do the work I need it to do and my apathy towards M$ OS's.

I just can't imagine an Atom CPU being useful with 3D object modeling, media transcoding and image editing. However, it should be noted that I am clearly a prime example of the sort of person who would be left behind should the media hysteria surrounding "the post-pc era" ever come to fruition.

uncommonsense
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uncommonsense,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2012 | 8:38:56 PM
re: 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta
Fujitsu T4215 seems to cooperate well with full functionality of the screen control buttons and stylus buttons too.
uncommonsense
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uncommonsense,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/3/2012 | 8:40:56 PM
re: 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta
Dell Latitude XT - not so good, drivers won't go in, slightly odd screen design makes accessing the Win 8 Betas tiny hotspots tricky.
Fill
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Fill,
User Rank: Strategist
4/4/2012 | 1:52:57 AM
re: 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta
It seems to me there is a hardware vs price vs OS vs services (e.g. cloud and OS updates) disconnect. You can have awesome hardware, but without apps, support, OS updates, good pricing, etc. it's kind of for not?
NovaUser
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NovaUser,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/4/2012 | 10:30:09 PM
re: 8 Tablets Fit For Windows 8 Beta
This is a weak article. The picture for the Samsung Series 7 Slate is wrong. You didn't even mention the new MSI AMD based tablet which also has a tpm chip built in.

I am running the windows 8 consumer preview on my Samsung Series 7 right now with bitlocker encryption. It is running Office. 2010, Visual Studio 2011 and it flys... The battery last over 6 hours... If I wanted too... I could even run Hyper-v, MS Viso, MS Project, Real Photoshop, or any of the Many many existing windows apps on it.

I use a iPad which I am using to type this. Anyone that trys to compares the Samsung Series 7 tablet and any of these tablets mentioned in this article to an iPad does not understand technology. I have one of each.. An iPad and a windows 8 slate... They both have their role/job that they are the best for...

The article only mentions the Windows 8 tablets based on x86/an iPad and 90% of the Android tablets run on a ARM which uses last power and provides a different experience. There is a ARM version of Windows 8 that is coming out.. And I can only image that there will be new Windows 8 ARM based tablets when it ships. Asus has mentioned at they will have one.

It would have helped if the writer of the article took the time to research if people were already running the Windows 8 consumer preview on any of the tablets that they mentioned.
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