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6/23/2014
02:45 PM
Michael Endler
Michael Endler
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Microsoft Surface Pro 3: Why To Buy

Microsoft's Surface Pro 3 is finally available. But just because you can replace your laptop with the Surface Pro 3 doesn't mean everyone will want to.

Surface Pro 3 Vs. World: Mobile Smackdown
Surface Pro 3 Vs. World: Mobile Smackdown
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

If you've read any reviews of Microsoft's Surface Pro 3 -- mine included -- you've likely been told it's a device that will appeal to some people, but not to everyone. This raises a question: How are you supposed to know which group you're in?

It's difficult to answer, because there are two distinct angles from which would-be buyers can approach Microsoft's new tablet, which hit stores Friday. Some think of the Pro 3 in terms of other devices. They might ask how it competes as a laptop with the MacBook Air, or whether it's as good a tablet as an iPad. Others look beyond comparisons, because the new Surface is unlike any other device currently available.

[Want to see more on the Surface Pro 3? See Microsoft Surface Pro 3: Visual Tour.]

I'll get to the latter group in a minute, but suffice it to say that, for certain jobs and work styles, the Pro 3's unique traits could be transformative. The former group, which I'll tackle first, is trickier.

Microsoft calls the Pro 3 the tablet that can replace a laptop, which is fair. Thin, light, fairly powerful, and more ergonomically polished than any of its predecessors (if not than any other 2-in-1), the Pro 3 is undeniably a nice laptop. When using earlier Surfaces, I never forgot that I was using a small, cramped, and compromised laptop. With the Pro 3, I don't feel these distractions. I can just work.

But just because you can replace your laptop with the Surface Pro 3 doesn't mean everyone will want to. The device's kickstand-based stability didn't bother me, but the approach is still fundamentally different from the clamshell designs most of us are used to. The difference is minute if you work at a desk, but whether you'll like balancing the Pro 3 on your lap is more subjective.

The Surface Pro 3's infinitely adjustable kickstand provides solid stability, but it's not the same as a clamshell design.
The Surface Pro 3's infinitely adjustable kickstand provides solid stability, but it's not the same as a clamshell design.

The Surface Pro 3's design makes it thinner and lighter than any comparably powerful alternatives, but it's not like many people have criticized the newest Ultrabooks -- let alone the MacBook Air -- as being too thick and heavy. Eventually, thinness hits a point of diminishing returns. Depending on your budget and needs, the Pro 3 might be past that point. Moreover, even if you prioritize sleek form factors, the market will be flush by early next year with even thinner, lighter devices, thanks to Intel's next-generation Broadwell processors.

Ultimately, if someone were to say the Surface Pro 3 is one the best laptops available, I wouldn't quibble -- which is saying something. If anyone tried to similarly lionize the Surface Pro or Surface Pro 2, I'd have called that person crazy. But if people were to say the Pro 3 simply didn't "click" with their needs, I wouldn't quibble with that, either -- especially given the Surface's price.

As a tablet, meanwhile, the Pro 3 is a different animal from an iPad. That hasn't stopped Microsoft execs from making the comparison; when the new Surface was introduced, Microsoft corporate vice president Panos Panay repeatedly juxtaposed it with a MacBook Air and an iPad, implying that the Pro 3 could replace both. This might be true for individual users, but on the whole, it's wishful thinking on Microsoft's part.

Sure, the Pro 3 overlaps in places with the iPad Air, but the devices handle differently and are good at different things. It's easy to draw equivalencies between them now that Office is available on iPads, but from apps to OS to ergonomics, the devices aren't interchangeable. I could see someone owning a Surface Pro 3 in addition to an iPad, but I'm skeptical that the former is truly a replacement for the latter.

But as I mentioned previously, there's more than one way to approach the Surface Pro 3. Compare it to devices you already know and like, and you'll probably find shortcomings. But think of its unique qualities, and you might find new ways of doing things.

The Surface Pro Pen, for example, creates a new category of tablet experience. Yes, iPads have more apps, and yes,

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Michael Endler joined InformationWeek as an associate editor in 2012. He previously worked in talent representation in the entertainment industry, as a freelance copywriter and photojournalist, and as a teacher. Michael earned a BA in English from Stanford University in 2005 ... View Full Bio
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mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2014 | 3:14:04 PM
Re: shopper report
@DDURBIN1,

To add to your comment, is like microsoft is rolling out the product based on a backlog that they've had from inseption, since it seems that they address certain things long past when customers demanded it (and it's available on the main competition).

I will say that in the office environemnt, I'm seeing a lot more people leaving there laptops docked, prefering to take there Surface Pro to meetings, and if need simply RDP to there main machine.... but I'm not sure if this is Microsoft aim, since the recent advertisement is trying to state that the surcae is a "laptop replacement", that I will say it is to some extend
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2014 | 8:45:50 AM
At the desk vs. ...?
They make ergonomic floor stands for tablets that will allow you to place them at just the right comfortable height for you, wherever you are (i.e., whether at a desk, on a couch or recliner, or even in bed).  This is especially important for somebody like me who has back and neck issues.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
6/26/2014 | 4:52:20 PM
Re: shopper report
Microsoft spends tons on market research and product feedback prior to market roll out.  I'm amazed they do so poorly at determining product features and understanding their demand for said product features.  I'd say MS was better at software product development than hardware but MS has none neither very well.  We will see if they learned anything from the Pro 2-256GB demand which I expect to be their big winner in the Pro 3 version.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2014 | 3:54:16 PM
Re: What about the glued in components/built in obsolescence/ impossibility to repair?
@beyond,

That's really disappointing. Thanks for sharing your experience-- sorry it didn't turn out better. Panos Panay tossed the Surface Pro 3 on the floor when he launched the device, in order to demonstrate its durability. Given that Microsoft is now volunteering that the device can survive a fall, I wonder if people will experience the same kind of service that you did.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2014 | 3:50:54 PM
Re: shopper report
Yeah, it'll be a real bummer if Microsoft runs into the same inventory problems that it ran into with the 256 GB Pro 2. They've given themselves some breathing room before the i3 and i7 models are expected, so hopefully they can meet their deadlines. I expect demand will be higher than it was for previous models, but we're not talking about iPad-level demand. If Microsoft could produce too many first-gen Surfaces, then they have the capacity to produce enough Pro 3s-- as long as they've planned well.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2014 | 3:47:00 PM
Re: Too expensive
@anon,

While Apple vs. Microsoft conversations often incite kneejerk fanboyism, I think there's more value to Apple than mere rhetoric. Admittedly, it's not all easy to quantify.  But Apple's usually the top seller of $1000+ PCs (which sometimes surprises people—but it makes sense if you think about it, given that virtually all Macs are more than $1000). Granted, Apple's popularity among affluent people doesn't dismiss the possibility that some people with too much money buy Apple products just to be fashionable. Nevertheless, this popularity indicates that people with enough money to be discerning choose Apple at a much higher rate. One assumes that some of these people perceive real value, rather the trendies, given the large numbers we're talking about.

Additionally, even though Apple machines use the same components as cheaper Windows machines, for certain kinds of performance, Apple machines perform better, thanks to Apple's tight control of both hardware and software. Moreover, while the internal components might be comparable to those in cheaper Windows devices, the external components are a different issue. I know design don't matter to everyone, especially if you're particularly utilitarian, but it matters to others—and if you make people comfortable, they'll be more productive. I think you can also make some arguments in favor of OS X, maybe not on the IT side, but for users, it's clearly a different aesthetic than Windows, and features such as Spaces are pretty great. Does that mean everyone would buy a MacBook Pro if money were no object? No, of course not. As you point out, gamers have better options, and if you're running a business and need to be frugal, you can get the job done with Windows machines while spending half as much. And even though I like OS X, I wouldn't fault somehow who subjectively just doesn't like it. But the point is—Macs provide some empirical value, and even if some of Apple's benefits aren't as tangible as specs, I think it offers more than rhetoric.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2014 | 3:23:38 PM
Re: Enterprise or bust
Compared to any other single manufacturer, Apple retains customers very, very well. Considering how expensive its computers are, that says something, doesn't it?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2014 | 3:20:41 PM
Re: Surface Pro 3 is a great productivity device for a lot of people, but probably not for the mass market
@indranil

Yes, definitely, the Surface Pro 3 will be a fine device for many students. Much more practical than the early models, in that regard.

As for marketing, I think they've corrected some problems while introducing others. The original Surface ads were sort of entertaining, but breakdancing employees and stomping school girls didn't really communicate how the devices were supposed to work. For the second-generation devices, Microsoft corrected this problem. The current Surface Pro 3 ad is probably the strongest one yet; in 30 seconds, it gives you a pretty fair and accurate look at all the ways you might use the device. It also doesn't hurt that the current commercial advertises a better product. But even though the commercials are better, many have questioned whether Microsoft should be emphasizing comparisons with the MacBook Air. While I can see why Microsoft is making the comparison, I can also see how it further muddies the waters regarding what Surface is, and for whom.
indranil_leo
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indranil_leo,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/26/2014 | 1:58:49 AM
Surface Pro 3 is a great productivity device for a lot of people, but probably not for the mass market
This is certainly one of the most balanced and quality review on Surface Pro 3 I have read. Certainly Surface Pro 3 is NOT a laptop, and it is also not a "tablet" as most people use it after the great success of the Apple Ipad. But it is also true that Microsoft has been in the business of making "tablets" much longer than Apple! I have owned one since 2005.

You have included few potential groups who would benefit from this device. I was surprised that you didn't mention students and academics. I used my tablet and onenote in class, to write lecture notes, record (synced to my notes) lectures, since 2005. As academics (professors, researchers, etc) we have to read a lot of papers, annotate, create notes, etc. I think from this view point the surface pro 3 is an amazing device I can also carry it with me for delivering presentation, and also work (write papers, run software, numerical analysis, write code) while traveling, write/draw ideas store e-books etc. I think the device is terrific for us. In fact I am amazed and happy that Microsoft is sticking to creating such device, when most people may be much happy to play angry birds on an iPad or Nexus. This is a productive device.

Of course just like any other tool, it has got its own idiosyncrasies and it is not perfect. I wished it had a GPU, I wish it had LTE, I wish a lot of things ... but Surface Pro 3 is not meant to be a super gaming device, it is not meant to be a super-computer, it is not meant to be a TV. Will it replace my powerful work machine? Certainly not! But can I carry around my work machine? Certainly not! There are always trade-offs/ compromises. People talk about apps, argue that you have millions of apps for iPad, and only thousands of apps for Windows. Who has even tried out the millions of apps? I own a Nexus. I don't think that I have ever gone beyond using more than 10-15 top quality apps. Of course it could just be me! may be I am missing something! But I won't know because I don't feel the need.

To some extent I certainly blame the marketing guys in Microsoft for not clearly differentiating their device, and to some extent even leading the consumers to the wrong way of thinking about its device. May be their technical and marketing teams talk different languages. On top of that they come out with such stupid (in my mind) and dirty tactics such as the $650 Mac exchange offer which clearly shows their desperation. I am dismayed by such tricks. At the same time I honestly feel that the Surface Pro 3 is a great overall productivity device.

Please note that I am neither an Apple or a Microsoft fanboy. I like using devices, and I own and use products from both (and many other) manufacturers.
mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2014 | 4:33:16 PM
Re: A Good Alternative
@stotheco,

This happened to me too, and from what I can tell the Nexus does suffer in performance when a certain amount of apps are installed, and I think it's because it's constantly updating.

I had a lot of games installed for my son, and as soon as I uninstalled all of them peformance improved, which goes to show that Android still has some work to do, since iOS doesn't suffer from this.
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