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Time Capsules: Lost, Found, And (Now) Virtual

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Time Capsules: Lost, Found, And (Now) Virtual
2. Today's Top Story
    - Microsoft Offers Reference Specs For Building Apps Around Office 2007
    Related Stories:
    - Microsoft Updates Office 2004 For The Mac
    - Microsoft Experiments With Mobile Social Networking
    - Microsoft IT, Services Chief Devenuti To Retire
    - Microsoft Sets New Patch Record, Fixes 26 Flaws
3. Breaking News
    - U.S. Court Order Could Boost Spam By 50 Billion Daily
    - Critics Fighting Approval Of AT&T's BellSouth Acquisition
    - Pay Inched Up For Tech Pros Last Quarter, Says Report
    - Gartner Dubious About Vista Coupons
    - Qualcomm Releases Eudora Into Open Source
    - EBay's 'Best Match' Search Worries Some Sellers
    - Special Report: The Cartridge Wars
    - Oracle To Pay $98.5 Million In U.S. Contract Violation
    - AMD Gives Deeper Peek Into Quad-Core Opteron
    - Google Launches Blog And Site To Showcase Its Mac Services
    - Google Weds Writely And Spreadsheets
4. Grab Bag
    - Teenager Moves Video Icons Just By Imagination (Washington University in St. Louis)
    - The Secret Failures Of Microsoft (RoughlyDrafted.com)
    - Disney-ABC: 'We Understand Piracy Now As A Business Model' (Ars Technica)
5. In Depth: Outsourcing In India
    - In India, Even Google Finds Job Recruiting Tough
    - India Needs More Parallel Programming Awareness, Intel Says
    - Outsourcer Infosys Reports 2Q Revenue Of $746 Million
    - India Tech Profits Up 30%, But Squeeze Coming
    - India Weighs Tougher Cybersecurity Laws After TV Expose
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Is It Time For A Browser Free-For-All?
7. White Papers
    - A CIO's Guide To Achieving Software Agility With Scrum
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"The charm of history and its enigmatic lesson consist in the fact that, from age to age, nothing changes and yet everything is completely different." -- Aldous Huxley


1. Editor's Note: Time Capsules: Lost, Found, And (Now) Virtual

Judging from our Web traffic, our contemporary readers are just as fascinated by the idea of time capsules as people from previous millennia. The story that Yahoo is beaming a digital time capsule into space by projecting it onto an ancient pyramid in Mexico has been our most popular story since the piece debuted earlier this week.

A time capsule, to quote Dictionary.com, is "a receptacle containing documents or objects typical of the current period, placed in the earth or in a cornerstone for discovery in the future."

Although the name "time capsule" was coined in 1937—the original term suggested was "time bomb"—the concept of time capsules goes back more than 5,000 years. The Epic Of Gilgamesh, the earliest known literary work, begins with instructions on how to find a box of copper inside a foundation stone in the walls of what was then a major city.

There are any number of famous time capsules "buried" in recent years. NASA has sent snapshots of earthling culture on interstellar probes out into space. An international consortium is in the middle of placing time capsules under the surface of Antarctica—which, of course, leads one to think alarmingly about a time when the polar caps will be history themselves—and plans to do the same on, yes, the moon. And the artist Andy Warhol completed more than 600 capsules, which are preserved among the archives of the Andy Warhol Museum.

One of the more interesting projects related to time capsules is one sponsored by the International Time Capsule Society, headquartered at Oglethorpe University in Atlanta. Established in 1990, the ITCS is the most systematic and rigorous ongoing study of time capsules, with the goal of documenting all kinds of time capsules no matter where they're located in the world—or what materials they're comprised of. The Yahoo project will obviously be of prime interest to this project.

The ITCS is setting up a registry of time capsules, of which it estimates there are tens of thousands already in existence. Since the vast majority of these have already been lost or destroyed, the ITCS hopes to prevent any new ones from meeting the same fate. Anyone who knows of any time capsules—and personal ones are definitely included—is encouraged to contact the ITCS with the relevant data.

Interested in creating your own time capsule? So popular has the activity become that special containers designed to protect against all the various dangers of water, air, and soil can be purchased from Target, Amazon.com, and a host of specialized retailers. The most prominent are Heritage Time Capsules and Applied History, should you want to check this option out for yourself.

What do you think? How useful are time capsules—virtual and otherwise? What would you archive if you put one together yourself? To read more about this subject, or to comment, visit my blog entry.

Alice LaPlante
Alice.laplante@gmail.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Microsoft Offers Reference Specs For Building Apps Around Office 2007
The specs allow third parties to build supply chain management apps around the Office 2007 stack. It's the first in a planned series of Office Reference Application Packs.

Related Stories:

Microsoft Updates Office 2004 For The Mac
The update fixes security problems and other issues.

Microsoft Experiments With Mobile Social Networking
The service lets mobile phone users exchange instant messages, find out each other's locations, and share photos.

Microsoft IT, Services Chief Devenuti To Retire
Nineteen-year Microsoft veteran Rick Devenuti will leave at the end of the year, and his replacement will be named in a few weeks.

Microsoft Sets New Patch Record, Fixes 26 Flaws
The flaws, more than half of which received a "critical" rating, run the gamut from Internet Explorer to Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.


3. Breaking News

U.S. Court Order Could Boost Spam By 50 Billion Daily
A U.S. District Court judge ordered anti-spam organization Spamhaus to pay $11.7 million in damages against an e-mail marketing company. The U.K.-based Spamhaus said the U.S. court had no jurisdiction, and ignored it. Now, anti-spam advocates worry that the judge might order ICANN to eliminate the Spamhaus domain.

Critics Fighting Approval Of AT&T's BellSouth Acquisition
The U.S. Department of Justice approved the deal, and the Federal Communications Commission plans to vote today. But critics say the acquisition hurts competition.

Pay Inched Up For Tech Pros Last Quarter, Says Report
ERP consultants and hardware engineers among top earners.

Gartner Dubious About Vista Coupons
Gartner to Microsoft: Coupons for discounted or free copies of Windows Vista won't help fourth-quarter PC sales.

Qualcomm Releases Eudora Into Open Source
The open source version of Eudora will be developed jointly by Qualcomm and Mozilla, which makes the Thunderbird mail client. The first open source version will be released in the first half of 2007.

EBay's 'Best Match' Search Worries Some Sellers
The online auction giant has started using "smart" searches to tell buyers what they want to see, rather than let them pick the best matches, one retailer says. He worries about possible negative effects on the coming holiday season.

Special Report: The Cartridge Wars
You think your printer is inexpensive? Think about how much you spend on ink or toner each year. We report on why it costs so much to print, and what is being done about it.

Oracle To Pay $98.5 Million In U.S. Contract Violation
The government paid inflated prices for software and services between 1997 and 2005 because of the false information provided by PeopleSoft, according to the Justice Department.

AMD Gives Deeper Peek Into Quad-Core Opteron
AMD described Barcelona, the company's first 65-nanometer server chip and its first native quad-core. The chip is designed to improve performance over previous processors.

Google Launches Blog And Site To Showcase Its Mac Services
Google's Mac software included widgets for checking the company's Web mail, posting blogs, and checking search history.

Google Weds Writely And Spreadsheets
Say goodbye to the Writely brand; Google plans to integrate the online word processor and Google Spreadsheets. The application suite will be called Google Docs & Spreadsheets.

All Our Latest News


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Analyzing The Outsourcers
How does your outsourcer stack up? Learn how more than 400 business-technology professionals rated six of the leading outsourcers in InformationWeek Research's Analyzing The Outsourcers: Global Services report.

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-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag

Teenager Moves Video Icons Just By Imagination (Washington University in St. Louis)
An experiment conducted by a team of neurosurgeons, neurologists, and engineers at Washington University in St. Louis is allowing a 14-year-old who suffers from epilepsy to play Space Invaders, a two-dimensional video game, using only brain signals.

The Secret Failures Of Microsoft (RoughlyDrafted.com)
Why Microsoft's previous successes won't help it succeed in new consumer electronics and digital-media download markets.

Disney-ABC: 'We Understand Piracy Now As A Business Model' (Ars Technica)
As big media companies finally warm up to the idea of ad-supported Internet content distribution, Disney-ABC executives have embarked upon a new strategy: trying to compete with piracy rather than trying to extinguish it wholesale.


5. In Depth: Outsourcing In India

In India, Even Google Finds Job Recruiting Tough
A board member cited a shortage of Web development skills such as knowledge of JavaScript and Ajax, used in Google Maps and Flickr. Middle managers also are in short supply, he said.

India Needs More Parallel Programming Awareness, Intel Says
Because the technology is so key going forward, Intel may set up labs in some of the software firms in India to teach programmers about it, one Intel executive says.

Outsourcer Infosys Reports 2Q Revenue Of $746 Million
In a sign that the furious growth of offshore IT outsourcing hasn't abated, India's Infosys Technologies reported Wednesday that revenue and income in its just-ended second fiscal quarter jumped more than 40%.

India Tech Profits Up 30%, But Squeeze Coming
Indian outsourcing companies are expected to have to increase high-tech salaries to keep workers from straying.

India Weighs Tougher Cybersecurity Laws After TV Expose
Following a U.K. documentary claiming India's outsourcing industry is infested with hackers and identity thieves, Indian authorities are feeling the heat to push through proposals that would toughen security.


6. Voice Of Authority

Is It Time For A Browser Free-For-All?
Chris Murphy ponders whether corporate IT, even if it wants to, will be able to squash consumer-driven adoption of alternate technologies such as the Firefox browser.


7. White Papers

A CIO's Guide To Achieving Software Agility With Scrum
Experts share their experiences on how IT executives can apply Scrum across large and distributed organizations.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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