300 Year Archival Life, 9 Bits/Pit, And Other Strange Optical Disk News - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
News
Commentary
7/5/2008
11:38 AM
Howard Marks
Howard Marks
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

300 Year Archival Life, 9 Bits/Pit, And Other Strange Optical Disk News

For some reason my desk today seems to be covered with press releases announcing cool breakthroughs in optical disk technology. In reality, it's covered with 4 disk drives, empty Chinese food containers, my daughter's sick laptop, beer bottles, cigar stubs, and the TARDIS USB hub, but I did see a bunch of optical disk news that ranged from "cool" to "and why would I buy that" to just unbelievable.

For some reason my desk today seems to be covered with press releases announcing cool breakthroughs in optical disk technology. In reality, it's covered with 4 disk drives, empty Chinese food containers, my daughter's sick laptop, beer bottles, cigar stubs, and the TARDIS USB hub, but I did see a bunch of optical disk news that ranged from "cool" to "and why would I buy that" to just unbelievable.On the cool front, a group of researchers from Tohoku University figured out that if they put a 90-degree V notch in the bottom of each pit on a DVD and used a polarized laser to read it, they could encode up to 9 bits in each pit by rotating the notch and reading the angle of the reflection. These V-shaped pits can be stamped out just like the round pits so disks with this enhanced capacity can be high-speed duplicated cheaply. Of course, even if they use the same mechanical specs as a DVD, the disks could only be readable on new equipment. The press release didn't mention recordability and that looks really hard to me.

Under "and how would we know," Delkin, a California vendor of digital photo accessories from memory cards and readers to camera skins and optical media, announced that its archival Blu-ray disks have a 200 year archival lifetime. Delkin's archival CD-R and DVD-R disks appear to be OEM versions of MAM-A's archival products, which are generally considered to the most stable disks you can buy. Truth is, some time long before the 200 years are up you'll have to copy the data because Blu-ray drives are getting hard to find. Well, they don't cost a lot more than other 4X BD-Rs, so why not.

Japan's NHK announced a flexible optical disk that rotates at 15,000 RPM to provide data rates of 250 MB/s that are required for use as broadcast HD storage. More info here. Conventional DVDs and CDs can only be spun up to 10,000 RPM before they fly apart.

Finally, ProAction Media's pitching its Flex-Lite disk as green because it uses half the expensive petrochemical product polycarbonate as a normal disk.

There it is, believe it or not, the good, the bad, and the forgettable. Now I guess I have to figure out which is which.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
State of the Cloud
State of the Cloud
Cloud has drastically changed how IT organizations consume and deploy services in the digital age. This research report will delve into public, private and hybrid cloud adoption trends, with a special focus on infrastructure as a service and its role in the enterprise. Find out the challenges organizations are experiencing, and the technologies and strategies they are using to manage and mitigate those challenges today.
Commentary
Augmented Analytics Drives Next Wave of AI, Machine Learning, BI
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  3/19/2020
Slideshows
How Startup Innovation Can Help Enterprises Face COVID-19
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  3/24/2020
Commentary
Enterprise Guide to Robotic Process Automation
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  3/23/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT Careers: Tech Drives Constant Change
Advances in information technology and management concepts mean that IT professionals must update their skill sets, even their career goals on an almost yearly basis. In this IT Trend Report, experts share advice on how IT pros can keep up with this every-changing job market. Read it today!
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll