Organizational leaders tend to believe their companies are innovative, but the competitive landscape can tell a much different story.

Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer

April 2, 2024

9 Slides

The technology sector is synonymous with innovation, but there are a lot of one-hit wonders and fewer organizations that have mastered the art and science of it. It turns out there are many differences between those who consistently innovate and those that don’t when simple things can make all the difference. 

“Only a small number of companies understand the business value of their entire portfolio of innovations in bringing an elevated concept to market,” says Trevor Anulewicz, VP, strategy at accelerator Launch by NTT Data. “[C]ompanies struggle with scaling innovations and calculating the value and ROI. They have to have a deep understanding of their ROI at the program level to scale, justify, secure funding and bring the right talent to continue to do this on repeat.” 

Once companies are clear on ROI, they can understand what type of innovator and company they want to be. They can also determine where they are in the innovation process and can establish a repeatable system for bringing new ideas to market successfully year after year. 

“In today’s competitive landscape, businesses have no choice but to evolve and improve. Organizations need a framework for continuous innovation that helps [them] generate and evaluate breakthrough ideas and rapidly prototype, test and scale promising concepts,” says Anulewicz. 

Using a framework also helps identify the blind spots, weak systems, and strategic errors holding the organization back.  

“Maturation is what the vast majority of large enterprises need to sustain innovation,” says Anulewicz. “Making it part of the fabric of the culture is how companies succeed in the long run.” 

The following are more points that can help companies navigate the pitfalls. 

About the Author(s)

Lisa Morgan

Freelance Writer

Lisa Morgan is a freelance writer who covers big data and BI for InformationWeek. She has contributed articles, reports, and other types of content to various publications and sites ranging from SD Times to the Economist Intelligent Unit. Frequent areas of coverage include big data, mobility, enterprise software, the cloud, software development, and emerging cultural issues affecting the C-suite.

Never Miss a Beat: Get a snapshot of the issues affecting the IT industry straight to your inbox.

You May Also Like


More Insights