Verizon IoT Strategy: Smart Cities, ThingSpace For Developers - InformationWeek
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10/29/2015
10:41 AM
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Verizon IoT Strategy: Smart Cities, ThingSpace For Developers

The market for the Internet of Things is growing rapidly, and Verizon is stepping up its efforts on a multitude of fronts, the company announced.

IoT World: Separating Smart And Dumb Things
IoT World: Separating Smart And Dumb Things
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Communications giant Verizon announced its plans for simplifying Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, which have the potential connect everything from medical devices to refrigerators to the Web.

The company introducing three end-to-end smart cities solutions: intelligent video, intelligent lighting, and intelligent traffic management. It also launched ThingSpace.

The solutions are designed to help municipalities integrate disparate systems, monitor traffic and safety conditions in real-time, and manage their systems in a dynamic way in order to improve efficiency and public safety.

The IoT platform allows developers to create applications, customers to manage devices, partners to market their services, and Verizon itself to launch integrated vertical solutions in an open environment.

ThingSpace lets users manage their IoT environments and related data, end-to-end, from device to network to application.

Developers can also build IoT solutions using Verizon's extensive capabilities and innovation resources. All developers -- even if they are not Verizon customers -- code and test on the ThingSpace platform.

(Image: Danil Melekhin/iStockphoto)

(Image: Danil Melekhin/iStockphoto)


Verizon will also hold a developers conference in Boston in December, at which a wide range of coders, including academia, startups, businesses, and public-sector organizations will have access to an expanded set of application programming interfaces (APIs) and application-enablement capabilities on ThingSpace.

The worldwide IoT market is expected to grow from $655.8 billion in 2014 to $1.7 trillion in 2020, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.9%, according to a June report from IT research firm IDC.

Devices, connectivity, and IT services will make up the majority of the IoT market in 2020. They are estimated to account for more than two-thirds of the market in 2020, with devices like modules and sensors alone representing nearly a third of the total.

"Continued innovation in smart cities, connected cars and wearables demonstrates that IoT is the future for how we will live and work," Mike Lanman, senior vice president of enterprise products at Verizon, said in a statement. "Despite the exciting potential, IoT is still too complex, too fragmented, too expensive to connect and too hard to scale. Success in that future relies on a leader that can cut through the complexity and change the IoT model. That's where Verizon comes in."

The company also highlighted the ways it is putting its IoT capabilities to work for customers in the marketplace through ongoing collaborations with tech giants like Intel and Renesas, one of the world's largest suppliers of microcontrollers.

In addition, Verizon is working with partners to embed LTE chipsets in a range of connected machines to automate the provisioning process and make it faster to deploy IoT devices on its wide-area network.

[Major players are heating up the IoT world. Read: IBM Buys The Weather Company In Watson IoT Push.]

Additional enhancements planned in 2016 include enabling Power Save Mode for IoT devices to facilitate several years of battery life.

While IoT technology could have far-reaching impacts in a variety of markets and industries, worries persist that security is going to be a major issue.

According to an August survey sponsored by Nexusguard, a specialist in distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) security solutions, IoT devices could be exploited during software updates and used as proxy servers to target businesses that can then be extorted for payment.

Nathan Eddy is a freelance writer for InformationWeek. He has written for Popular Mechanics, Sales & Marketing Management Magazine, FierceMarkets, and CRN, among others. In 2012 he made his first documentary film, The Absent Column. He currently lives in Berlin. View Full Bio

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Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
12/20/2015 | 3:01:44 PM
Re: IoT
Yes, IOT is still fragmented, but there's nothing like the commitment of a giant like Verizon to give it a more solid base to spread out from, and perhaps establish standards. That's what happening in the "Industrial Internet" segment of the IOT, where General Electric has jumped in and is using its own version to gather information from its huge installed base of capital equipment worldwide.
Sarouel123
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Sarouel123,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/5/2015 | 7:39:28 AM
Re: little sense
Lot of companies have to deals with many plateforms that don't talk to each others as u mentionned and thats alot of trouble on a daily basis.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
10/31/2015 | 5:13:43 PM
Re: Verizon IoT Strategy: Smart Cities, ThingSpace For Developers
Looking at IoT, it seems like on the one hand, the 'smart city' is quite a ways off. Others mentioned the very real and very scary (how seasonal!) security concerns, the huge infrastructure needs, necessary legal framework, and so much more. On the other hand, most of the technology itself seems to be not so far off, in terms of the sensors themselves, the standards, and the framework for how the data is handled. People already own smartphones powerful enough to to tie this all together. Seems smart by Verizon to launch something that will let developers tinker and get ahead of the game. And, hey, the conference is local to me. I'll have to see if I can check it out!
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2015 | 11:10:06 PM
Re: IoT and security
"General Motors recently had a hiccup when their smart car was hacked by two programmers who did it to show how loosely held is the security concerning IOT. And anything concerning cloud should be made secure"

@SunitaT0: I think the teething issues will always be there. There will always be security risks lurking around but they should be for the initial phases. Once it goes into the mainstream then they will iron out. Cloud security is becoming stronger by the day and we all know how strongly was the security issue raised around earlier on.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2015 | 11:06:20 PM
Re: IoT and security
"Some people still don't think the market is ready for IOT even though for the obvious implications that we do need IOT."

@SunitaT0: I agree that there's some skepticism in the market with regards to IoT, but not to a great deal. I think what we need is a strong player to come up with an IoT product and launch it for the masses. Then we will see some change in perspective and opinions coming about.
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
10/30/2015 | 10:10:33 AM
little sense
All Tesco's are bent on putting on IoT platforms of their own. This makes little sense. Two or three Telco's should put together a single platform in a single country or in a single union. Having too many platforms that don't talk to each other makes little sense.
tag4001
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tag4001,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/30/2015 | 4:16:40 AM
IoT
VZ has a good idea, that has well intentions.  However, without a clear idea of with IoT really is and without joint agreement of the mass, they might be creating an ecosystem that is proprietary in nature and siloed.

IoT in nature is still too complex, fragmented, and lacking of a solid footprint.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2015 | 3:46:52 PM
Re: IoT and security
@tzubair: the risks do exist. No denying that. General Motors recently had a hiccup when their smart car was hacked by two programmers who did it to show how loosely held is the security concerning IOT. And anything concerning cloud should be made secure.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2015 | 3:44:38 PM
Re: IoT and security
Yes I agree so too. The rollout of some of the IOT devices haven't been smooth mainly because of inability of acceptance. Some people still don't think the market is ready for IOT even though for the obvious implications that we do need IOT.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2015 | 3:12:29 PM
IoT and security
"While IoT technology could have far-reaching impacts in a variety of markets and industries, worries persist that security is going to be a major issue"

I think the security risks do surface around the IoT technology, but I believe a large number of these risks are exaggerated and will be sorted out once the technology becomes mainstream. I don't think in the long run security will create major hurdles for IoT technology as long as proper protocols are followed.
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