Shutterstock CIO on Leadership: Reduce the Cycle of Fear - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Cloud // Infrastructure as a Service
News
5/31/2017
08:00 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Shutterstock CIO on Leadership: Reduce the Cycle of Fear

Shutterstock grew so fast it needed to convert applications and move them into the Amazon cloud quickly; API-based development followed.

For a CIO who believes that "people spend more time figuring out how not to do something, rather than doing it," David Giambruno at Shutterstock has been a remarkably successful. If you heard him speak May 19 at Interop ITX, you might even say he's an inspirational leader.

He is doubtful that being in a position of authority and having the best interests of the company at heart is enough. He is a disbeliever that things will turn out all right. Something more is needed -- a dash of showmanship, and cynicism, as well. In June 2016, he was brought in as CIO at Shutterstock to help bring the right technologies to bear on the business.

Giambruno found a company that was trying to rapidly adapt to Web-scale operations. It originated in 2003 with founder Jon Oringer adding dozens of photos a day – most of them taken by himself – to Shutterstock.com. They were images that could be downloaded for a small fee and used in advertising or in connection with other commercial publications, displacing the $500 images that companies used to acquire from Getty Images. Within a year, ShutterStock.com had 30,000 images, taken mostly by Oringer.

Then the company hired a photo director in 2004-2005 and $100-a-day models for everything from pictures of Central Park picnics to fine dining and enthusiastic coffee consumption. Shutterstock sold more images, now at a low monthly subscriptions of $49. In 2012, the company went public. In October 2013, instead of Oringer taking pictures, Shutterstock had 100,000 image contributors uploading pictures at the rate of three a second. according to Forbes. By March 2016, it had 1.4 million customers downloading images, according to Entrepreneur. They now download at the rate of five a second, according to company spokesmen. Shutterstock also added a broad video collection to its offerings.

Growth and its challenges

In mid-2016, Gianbruno understood both the challenges and the pitfalls at a company having made it that far. He had the benefit of previous stints as CIO at Tribune Media 2013-16, where he cut 56 data centers down to two, and Revlon from 2009-2013. Much of what the IT staff at Shutterstock had learned in the company's previous phases might now stand in the way of the next thing it needed to do.

In a session at Interop ITX, Building a Next Generation, API-driven Infrastructure for Scaling Growth, Giambruno described some of the tactics he employed at Revlon, Tribune Media and Shutterstock to get the organizations where they needed to go. He isn't one to stand on ceremony or the respected way of doing things. It's not IT's job to look smart and act professional. It's IT's job "to enable the business to turn around and move forward," he said. As for the much vaunted Information Technology Infrastructure Library way of doing things, "ITIL is for idiots," he said.

Want to learn more about flexible IT management? See Under Pressure, IT May Need to Fail Fast With Some Projects.

Nevertheless, he acknowledged, the problem of change is that the path forward isn't clear. That induces fear in part of a staff and outright resistance among an estimated 10%. One of the IT manager's challenges is "to take the fear out of the cycle...Show the people what can be done."

Image: Shutterstock/Blackboard
Image: Shutterstock/Blackboard

Shutterstock needed to be able to keep up with young competitors, like VideoBlock, which were bypassing Shutterstock's build-out of its own infrastructure in favor of starting out in Amazon Web Services. He knew Shutterstock needed to use the expandable storage, networking and easy access of the cloud and reduce its reliance on its own data centers.

One of his operational principles was to avoid distractions and "time-suckers," where they might occur. "Focus on the outcomes," he coached his staff.

To do that, the staff had to stop fixing internal data center problems and start making the cloud infrastructure work for them. At Revlon, the IT staff spent 12 months transforming its applications, with all but five moving into the cloud.

Reliance on the cloud tends to result in improved uptime. In his previous CIO jobs, IT operations maintained .999999% (six nines) uptime and avoided $70 million in additional costs they would have encountered if it continued to only run its own data centers, he said at the Interop session.

"You need time to innovate and transform the company. There's no time to fix things. Getting to software-defined everything means massive efficiency," he said. The cloud offers that efficiency if the IT staff can migrate its applications there and learn the ropes of operating its infrastructure. Staff developers need to learn to build their next generation applications using API-based services in the cloud.

Enable greatness

"Creating the environment for innovation takes a lot of energy" on the part of IT leadership, he continued. "As a leader, it is my job to make people great, not just do great things. Doing something great is way easier than being great," he said.

The environment for innovation is also the environment in which the company will transform itself into a player in the digital economy, said Giambruno, but it requires changes in traditional IT thinking. The staff has to be willing to try to do things and sometimes fail. "Make people feel safe" as they do that, is one of his rules of transformation.

Try to allow business teams the chance to "see and think about what can be done," now that there are technologies that can reach people and deliver services in new ways. Show examples of what can be done "to start the discussion," then encourage one step after another to drive continuous improvement.

To illustrate the change he used an irreverent quote he once heard: "How did God create the universe in seven days? No legacy infrastructure."

At Revlon, he found a way to emphasize IT's newfoiund sense of innovation: he installed sliding doors at the entrance of the headquarters data center which made a sound that mimicked those on Star Trek. The stunt cost $40,000 but they became a hit, an overt symbol of the new Revlon and its ability to innovate. Giambruno was congratulated on the move, although he had harbored suspicions that he could be fired for the expenditure at the time he made it.

Editor's Note: This article was corrected May 31 to cite Giambruno’s previous experiences at Revlon and Tribune Media as well as current experience at Shutterstock.

Charles Babcock is an editor-at-large for InformationWeek and author of Management Strategies for the Cloud Revolution, a McGraw-Hill book. He is the former editor-in-chief of Digital News, former software editor of Computerworld and former technology editor of Interactive ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
Digital Transformation Myths & Truths
Transformation is on every IT organization's to-do list, but effectively transforming IT means a major shift in technology as well as business models and culture. In this IT Trend Report, we examine some of the misconceptions of digital transformation and look at steps you can take to succeed technically and culturally.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll