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The Modern Data Strategy in the Interop Spotlight

As Interop ITX opened with summits and workshops, experts from Silicon Valley Data Science highlighted some of the new considerations for a modern data strategic plan.

James M. Connolly

May 15, 2017

2 Min Read

The wide-spread adoption of data initiatives by enterprises highlights the need for new approaches to creating a data strategy. The bottom line is that it's time to recognize that it isn't 2012 any more.

That was the underlying theme as Interop ITX kicked off with the workshop Developing a Modern Enterprise Data Strategy, presented by John Akred, CTO of consultancy Silicon Valley Data Science and Edd Wilder-James, SVDS Vice President for Strategy.

Think back to the typical way organizations kicked off their data strategies a few years ago. They focused only on elements such as taking a data inventory, establishing rules about the life span for certain data types, and which tools were going to be used.

Today, those factors still matter, but crafting the strategy also requires an understanding of what the business wants -- needs -- to do with data, how the company culture and processes have to change, and how to build a partnership between business managers and tech teams.

For a modern data strategy you have to ask, "Can you make sure that what you are going to build is going serve as a foundational element for what you are going to build in future, rather than being a silo?" asked Wilder-James.

Akred added, "It's not a data warehousing strategy. It's what we are doing with data and what can we do to make it work for the organization." Part of that is to identify where there are data gaps, what the company doesn't know about its customers, operations, and other important areas.

The SVDS speakers outlined their methodology for developing a modern data strategy during the session. Key points included the need to define the strategic imperatives of an organization, which, for example, might mean that a healthcare company understands that it wants to provide seamless, integrated care by multiple care providers. Then the organization has to define the business objectives, which in the case of the healthcare company could be to provide better access to electronic health records.

 

About the Author(s)

James M. Connolly

Contributing Editor and Writer

Jim Connolly is a versatile and experienced freelance technology journalist who has reported on IT trends for more than three decades. He was previously editorial director of InformationWeek and Network Computing, where he oversaw the day-to-day planning and editing on the sites. He has written about enterprise computing, data analytics, the PC revolution, the evolution of the Internet, networking, IT management, and the ongoing shift to cloud-based services and mobility. He has covered breaking industry news and has led teams focused on product reviews and technology trends. He has concentrated on serving the information needs of IT decision-makers in large organizations and has worked with those managers to help them learn from their peers and share their experiences in implementing leading-edge technologies through such publications as Computerworld. Jim also has helped to launch a technology-focused startup, as one of the founding editors at TechTarget, and has served as editor of an established news organization focused on technology startups at MassHighTech.

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