9 Reasons DevOps Is A Dirty Word - InformationWeek
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10/19/2016
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9 Reasons DevOps Is A Dirty Word

DevOps means a massive change for most organizations and requires serious commitment from management and workers. It isn't for everyone, but is it really for anyone? Here are nine reasons DevOps might not be right for you and your organization.
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(Image: anathomy/iStockphoto)

(Image: anathomy/iStockphoto)

Everyone wants to be on the cutting edge of operational productivity. When organizations develop new and better ways of doing things, it's natural for them to spread throughout the industry. Once in a while, though, the new way of doing things is terrible.

If you want to get a good fistfight started, it's hard to do better than throwing out a challenge to someone's chosen methods for developing software and running the IT department. When you can slap someone with a challenge to both of those in one word, then you're setting up a barbed wire cage match.

[See Agile vs. DevOps: 10 Ways They're Different.]

DevOps is one of the hottest trends in software development and IT operations. It combines software development, application deployment, and IT operations in a more or less seamless stream of IT goodness and bliss.

I've written about some keys to successful DevOps and some of the tools that can help you win at DevOps. But there has to be another side to the argument, so I went looking for those who don't like DevOps at all.

While I didn't find a quadrant of the internet crawling with DevOps haters -- this isn't politics, after all -- I did find quite a few people who were skeptics or DevOps antagonists. I combed through many of those blog posts and articles to pull together some of the more common reasons for saying that DevOps is a rotten methodology that no sane organization should attempt.

Here's something to keep in mind: Among DevOps fans and opponents, I haven't run across anyone who says that DevOps should be embraced by absolutely every organization out there.

It works well for some. It's an uncomfortable fit for others. It would be an utter disaster for a third group. Some of the horror stories come from companies in the third group that have strained mightily to make DevOps work, so keep context in mind.

Having put these anti-DevOps rationales out into the world, I'm curious to hear your take. Have I expressed something that you think but haven't put into writing? Am I preaching to the choir, here? Or is this article proof that I've finally lost my mind? Let me know here or on Twitter, and we'll continue the conversation -- whether or not we continue the move to DevOps.

Curtis Franklin Jr. is executive editor for technical content at InformationWeek. In this role he oversees product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he acts as executive producer for InformationWeek Radio and Interop Radio where he works with ... View Full Bio

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PolyglotITSolutions
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PolyglotITSolutions,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/24/2017 | 3:13:51 AM
I do agree!
Hello Curtis franklin,

I do agree about what you have described in this article because in my opinion DevOps doesn't fit for every organization which deals with learning or documented kind of org.
lncubem5p
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lncubem5p,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/26/2016 | 5:01:52 PM
Re: People, Process, Tools, & Business Culture
The thing about DevOps is its success is really in Project and Operations teams. As such Middle management can make it work without much input from C-level buy-in. If you look at Activity Based Managament, it is really an ops way of managing, and most Projects also use that, i.e. can we get another resource that does not cost as much. So at Release & Change if the project is set to be a normal change the teams can be made up of middle to junior level team members from those business functions making the project.

 
lncubem5p
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lncubem5p,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/26/2016 | 4:31:33 PM
Re: Another DevOps Challenge
DevOps works best in a "cake slice" business model here the service is slided with all business functions it uses and these are then costed at times as a function of their units of usage i.e. human hours of x to implement y. This is part of using Activity Based Management can cost almost all activities within each business funaction that is required to deliver a service and that service inturn can have Profit & Loss calculated. DevOps works better in service oriented model. In fact in DevOps it is quicker to identify diversionary work than in current work modules.
lncubem5p
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lncubem5p,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/26/2016 | 4:31:27 PM
Re: Another DevOps Challenge
DevOps works best in a "cake slice" business model here the service is slided with all business functions it uses and these are then costed at times as a function of their units of usage i.e. human hours of x to implement y. This is part of using Activity Based Management can cost almost all activities within each business funaction that is required to deliver a service and that service inturn can have Profit & Loss calculated. DevOps works better in service oriented model. In fact in DevOps it is quicker to identify diversionary work than in current work modules.
lncubem5p
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lncubem5p,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/21/2016 | 3:08:47 PM
DevOps for the continuous learning/documenting and adoptive organizations.
You are correct, DevOps is not for everybody, it is surely only for the continuous learning/documenting and adoptive organizations.

1)  There are about 10 project types: New service, Service Maintenance, Service Upgrade, Service Integration, M&A, Data Analytics, Service Business Process Analysis, and Research.

2)  These can be divided into 3 levels of work: Significant, Normal or Standard.

3)  All being performed mostly on 5 platforms: Windows, Unix, other

4)  Using a finite number of languages.

5) Generaly 4 environments: SANDBOX, BUILDing/DEVelopment, TEST/QA,PRODuction/Operations

DevOps is the team of experts at the level of the project as in 2 that has the end to end [in the environment promotion] interest of that service as measured by SLA. It is true that all projects are unique but using this thinking then we do not have any expert for alternative paths of a project are infinite. If the organization uses Activity Based Management it would easly understand its services, channels and cutomers which would drive the type of project. 
kjjoyce
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kjjoyce,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/21/2016 | 2:30:42 AM
Another DevOps Challenge
Another challenge I have seen with DevOps in some organisations is the financial aspect of IT management where there is a need to capitalise some work and expense others.  Generally project development is identified and capitalised, and support or operations work is not.  DevOps can blur the line and make it harder to quantify the work spent on building or significantly enhancing the software assets (which can be capitalised) vs time spent fixing bugs or making minor improvements (which can't be capitalised).  Estimating, costing and priortising work for individual projects within the DevOps release cycle can also seem like a difficult thing for those required to deliver projects, especially more complex projects which require changes across a diverse range of IT systems and devices.    So while users of the applications will often not care about these distinctions, and would usually benefit from the DevOps approach which doesn't put projects and operations into separate silos, people like CFOs, CIOs, and Project Managers may not see the same benefit.
Zenonusc
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Zenonusc,
User Rank: Strategist
10/20/2016 | 11:11:14 AM
People, Process, Tools, & Business Culture
Mr. Franklin brings up great points in this article.  For initiatives like Dev/Ops to succeed in an organization the enterprise needs to consider the project from a 360 degree perspective.  People, process, tools, and the culture of the organization will all have to be examined and addressed as it relates to desired business outcomes. Enabling Dev/Ops in an organization is a journey.  A phased approach, utilizing projects that have short cycles that help organizations reach each milestone along their journey to Dev/Ops, mitigate risk, and can eventually lead to success. It requires commitment and investment from executive management.  The projected benefits of Dev/Ops have to justify the investment of time and resources. 
Eric@Quercia
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Eric@Quercia,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/20/2016 | 10:58:00 AM
Right tools for the job
The argument about DevOps or any other methods boil down to one single common sense recommendation: choose the right tool for the job in-hand.  As professionals we should be able to make that call without getting caught up in hype or methods tribalism.

I wouldn't expect a medium to large organisation to see any benefit from using a DevOps approach to maintaining its HR system, but it may well do so for making changes to a C2B platform.

 
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