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CES: Sony Tackles Bluetooth, NFC And UWB With Its Own Tech

Just what the world needs, another wireless transfer protocol. Combining the best of Bluetooth 3.0, near-field communications, and ultra wideband, Sony offered up <a href="http://www.eetimes.com/news/latest/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=205210037">TransferJet</a> at CES. Simply touch two TransferJet devices together and transfer video, picture, or audio content between the two at 560 Mbps.

Eric Ogren

January 9, 2008

1 Min Read

Just what the world needs, another wireless transfer protocol. Combining the best of Bluetooth 3.0, near-field communications, and ultra wideband, Sony offered up TransferJet at CES. Simply touch two TransferJet devices together and transfer video, picture, or audio content between the two at 560 Mbps.Yes, you read that correctly: 560 Mbps. That's peak speeds, of course. Average sustained transfer speeds will be closer to 375 Mbps. Still, that ain't half bad for sending files between two devices with no wires.

Sony decided existing ultra wideband technology wasn't good enough and went and put together its own protocol based on the UWB standard. It blasts bits through the air in the 4.48-GHz spectrum frequency at a distance of 30 millimeters, which is about 1.25 inches. So your devices have to get cozy with one another.

The image Sony has in mind is you take your phone or other mobile device hosting content, place it on your TV, and the two devices automatically pair and the phone will transfer the content to the TV automatically. Zoom.

If you're worried about interference or security, don't be. Sony says TransferJet doesn't interfere with your other wireless systems, and it has a security scheme worked out to protect your data. It didn't elaborate on what that scheme is or how it works.

Sony already has created chips small enough for dongles, but needs to start convincing its partners and customers to adopt the protocol for it to really take off. Only time will tell if it is an attractive enough alternative to other wireless transfer protocols to reach mass adoption.

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