People, not technology, create innovation. Here's a look at some people who will drive these and other business-technology trends in 2002.

InformationWeek Staff, Contributor

December 21, 2001

2 Min Read

Despite the uncertainty about the year ahead, there are some things about business technology we can say with confidence: The security of computer networks will undergo greater scrutiny. Close collaboration with business partners will be an important goal--one that will remain difficult to achieve. Biotechnology will deepen our understanding of what makes us human--and, in the process, push the boundaries of what supercomputers can do. The Internet will grow in importance as a fundamental tool of communication and commerce. And entrepreneurs will change how we do business. This we also know with certainty: People, not technology, create innovation. Heres a look at some people who will drive these and other business-technology trends in 2002.

Peter Thiel, CEO of PayPal Inc.

David Busser, CIO of the 2002 Winter Olympics

Michael Robertson, founder of MP3.com and Lindows.com

Carol Kovac, IBM's VP of life sciences

Richard Clarke, chairman of the President's Critical Infrastructure Protection Board

Christopher Klaus & Thomas Noonan, Internet Security Systems Inc.

Michael Vatis, founding director of the National Infrastructure Protection Center

Dr. Paul Tang, chief medical information officer at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation

Gene Tyndall, VP of global markets and E-commerce for Ryder

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