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Justify That Server

Running critical applications in a private cloud is a fundamental departure from business as usual

Michael Biddick

November 12, 2010

1 Min Read

Running critical applications in a private cloud is a fundamental departure from business as usual: When we virtualize, the server's CPU, memory, hard disk, and network controller are shared across a number of applications. This presents unique opportunities for IT--and challenges for APM tools. Private clouds enabled by virtualization can deliver more efficiency with less cost, if servers are used to maximum capacity and new hardware purchases are tightly controlled. Enforcing this discipline is much easier with an APM system in place. Before approving additional servers, for example, IT must clearly understand current capacity and performance. Overlay the data gleaned from APM systems, and it's much easier to see if that new server is really warranted. One caution: You can't depend on physical-to-virtual conversion tools to move your APM software to the private cloud. Since APM is critical to reducing server acquisition costs and managing capacity and performance, factor in the migration or purchase of a new APM suite up front.

About the Author(s)

Michael Biddick

CEO, Fusion PPT

As CEO of Fusion PPT, Michael Biddick is responsible for overall quality and innovation. Over the past 15 years, Michael has worked with hundreds of government and international commercial organizations, leveraging his unique blend of deep technology experience coupled with business and information management acumen to help clients reduce costs, increase transparency and speed efficient decision making while maintaining quality. Prior to joining Fusion PPT, Michael spent 10 years with a boutique-consulting firm and Booz Allen Hamilton, developing enterprise management solutions. He previously served on the academic staff of the University of Wisconsin Law School as the Director of Information Technology. Michael earned a Master's of Science from Johns Hopkins University and a dual Bachelor's degree in Political Science and History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Michael is also a contributing editor at InformationWeek Magazine and Network Computing Magazine and has published over 50 recent articles on Cloud Computing, Federal CIO Strategy, PMOs and Application Performance Optimization. He holds multiple vendor technical certifications and is a certified ITIL v3 Expert.

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