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Productivity 2000

InformationWeek Research evaluates the relationship between IT investment and worker productivity in its report, Productivity 2000.

InformationWeek Staff

October 19, 2001

1 Min Read

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Do IT managers believe they can boost worker productivity through the investments in IT products or services? What technology is driving gains in worker productivity? Are managers doing everything possible to increase worker productivity? And which business solutions are most effective in boosting employee output? InformationWeek Research evaluates the relationship between IT investment and worker productivity in its report, Productivity 2000.

InformationWeek Research interviewed 300 IT and business executives familiar with their organization's use of productivity metrics and standards in March 2000 to measure worker productivity in today's workplace. Are IT and business managers equally interested in worker output? How is productivity measured if at all? Which technology and non-technical business practices are influencing employee output? And is the promise of enhanced productivity swaying corporate buying decisions? These issues and more are examined in the 60-page report.

Findings are also classified according to output level. Respondents are categorized as high or low productivity producers to enable the comparison of different business practices.

The sample is also segmented according to revenue to examine any financial impact on worker output. Participating companies are sized into two groups, small and midsize firms with annual revenue under $500 million and midsize and large organizations with revenue higher than $500 million.

Slides: 60Charts: 43

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