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Analytics: Where The Girls Are

Data science is a field where men and women enjoy near parity in terms of university students and jobs, according to one expert.

Michael Steinhart

December 20, 2013

1 Min Read

We hear a lot about the underrepresentation of women in STEM jobs, but analytics is shaping up to be a level playing field, according to one industry expert's predictions for 2014.

Steven Hillion, chief product officer at Alpine Data Labs, listed this assertion at the top of his new year's forecast:

Women will take a far more prominent role in the world of data science, helping solve the data scientist shortage. Women are leading and succeeding in data science. Data science draws upon applied sciences where women have had great success. Data science is collaborative and communicative -- characteristics that have been traditionally associated with women. We're increasingly seeing more and more women entering and excelling in data science. Leading data scientists are as likely to be a woman as a man.

This prediction is based primarily on a talk that Hillion gave at this year's Strata Conference in New York. He said that, unlike in most IT roles, women are fairly close to achieving parity with men in data analysis.

Read the rest of this article on All Analytics.

About the Author(s)

Michael Steinhart

Executive Editor, AllAnalytics.com

Michael Steinhart has been covering IT and business computing for 15 years, tracking the rising popularity of virtualization, unified fabric, high-performance computing, and cloud infrastructures. He is editor of The Enterprise Cloud Site, which won the Least Imaginative Site Name award in 2012, and he managed TheITPro.com, a community of IT professionals taking their first steps into cloud computing. From 2006 to 2012, Steinhart worked as an executive editor at Ziff Davis Enterprise, writing and managing research reports, whitepapers, case studies, magazine features, e-newsletters, blog posts, online videos, and podcasts. He also moderated and presented in dozens of webinars and virtual tradeshows. He got his start in IT journalism at CMP Media back in 1998, then moved to PC Magazine, managing the popular Solutions section and then covering business technology and consumer software. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in communications/journalism from Ramapo College of New Jersey.

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