Cellphone-Cancer Link Revealed In Government Study - InformationWeek

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Cellphone-Cancer Link Revealed In Government Study
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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
6/4/2016 | 9:08:31 AM
Re: Frequency killer
tjgkg,

It's most likely the way you say it would be, but it doesn't make any sense to me. For instance, how is it Okay to kill a criminal sending them to the electric chair, or administering a lethal injection, and not Okay to use them for some good to society testing drugs that could serve to save good people? Testing in humans drugs that are intended to be used on humans makes more sense than using mice, or any other animal. 

Could you explain one thing is Okay and not the other? How would the law accepts one, and not the other? Think of murderers, serial killers, etc. Would society be compasionate? Would society prefer to keep seeing their relatives and friends die from illnesses that could have a cure if scientistist could properly test new drugs in real proportions on those humans whom the law and society are killing anyway? 

If you can explain the logic to me I might be able to understand. Otherwise, it doesn't make sense to me.

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
6/4/2016 | 8:10:50 AM
Re: Cell phone harard
Bill, 

Neither do I. No one in he world will give up their smartphone for anything. This kind of recycled research has been going on for years with always the same results reported in a different way. The resources could be used for something more productive. 

-Susan 
BillDChandler
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BillDChandler,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/3/2016 | 11:30:31 AM
Cell phone harard
Of course we all know the real danger of the cell pone is in driving accidents,

far exceeds this 2-3%  And ask yourself, with all the other risks in your life and

the use you get from your cell phone.  Will this make you give up your cell phone?

 

I dont hink so.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/3/2016 | 8:19:20 AM
Re: Frequency killer
Then we get into the harmful range, will sharing an office/home/apartment with an iPhone user cause second hand wifiradiation?  Will we need phone free buses and restaurants?  I think the real panic though won't be from carriers or hardware manufacturers, they are pretty well equipped to protect themselves.  Imagine a small business who requires their 2 person sales team to carry cellular phones.  If one of them develops any type of cancer that company is probably sunk when the lawyers get involved.
hho927
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hho927,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2016 | 7:58:58 PM
Re: Frequency killer
No worry! Other parts of the body is less prone to waves than brain.

If you're really that worry. Put in in your back pockets. Then you claim it gives b&tt cancer lol.

 
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2016 | 12:51:39 PM
Re: Frequency killer
Susan: I don't think we will ever get to the point of testing on death row inmates in the US. Even with their consent i think there would be many legal hurdles to overcome let alone public pressure against it. It is hard enough to allow terminal cancer patients to try out experimental drugs. I think the mice are here to stay, mainly because they go through generations much faster than humans which allow testers to see effects far into the future than they would testing an animal with a human life span.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
6/2/2016 | 12:30:48 PM
Re: Frequency killer
Yeah, then you wind up with testicular or ovarian cancer instead of brain cancer.  :p
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2016 | 12:06:57 PM
Re: Frequency killer
WHile the cancer risk has been tenuous over the years, you still have to take it seriously. In the old days when you had the pull out antenna, the radiation was directed away from your head. Today, that is a different story. And with cellular frequencies changing, we still do not know what to expect on a consistent basis. Using a headset with a wire is not really practical or convenient if you are on the go. Even Bluetooth devices have some questions surrounding them concerning cancer.
tjgkg
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tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2016 | 10:35:42 AM
Re: Frequency killer
Great points! And given the changing cellular frequencies over the years, how could a lawyer pinpoint when the cancer started? With tobacco products it is pretty straightforward. With electronic devices, it will be a much harder case to prove. Was it the company's wifi or was it Verizon? Was it an iPhone with the infamous antennae or another company phone?
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/1/2016 | 9:53:35 AM
Re: Frequency killer
I'm sure it's more complex than the occasional cellular causing brain tumors and while you mention that devices are getting better over the years we're also spending more time on them.  Is it better to have higher doses of radiation for short and infrequent periods of time or lower doses over very long and frequent periods of time.  I don't go anywhere that I don't see someone on a cellular phone when just a decade ago it was still somewhat unusual to see someone making a call in a restaurant or walking through the grocery store. 
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