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Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
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RobPreston
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RobPreston,
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8/26/2013 | 8:08:56 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
My thinking as well. If Microsoft can't become a leading mobile player, then it's done over the long haul. This is a market where it simply must succeed.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
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8/24/2013 | 8:25:02 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
You hit it on the head. Microsoft repeatedly takes the wrong angle when marketing to the general public (though I think Nokia's done a pretty good job marketing the newest hardware's photo capabilities). And in the smartphone markets, WP8 lacks the retail and OEM support to be more than an afterthought.

Windows Phone 8 is a good platform, and we'll see how much enthusiasm Microsoft can generate on its own with the big WP update that's supposed to be coming next year. But it's a tough space to compete in, and without more support from the extended ecosystem, Microsoft could continue to have a tough time. Nokia's made some progress, especially in emerging markets-- but we'll have to see if it can maintain that momentum, given that Apple is allegedly eyeing the budget market too, with the iPhone 5C, and that Android already owns it.
WKash
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WKash,
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8/23/2013 | 7:19:26 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
At a government IT forum in Washington, the Navy's CIO Terry Halverson acknowledged that government workers are likely to continue being a three form-factor tech user: Desk/laptop (for creation), tablet (for consumption) and smartphones (for mobile convenience). Windows 8 held the promise to deliver on all three but clearly hasn't caught fire. That's why the smartphone question is an interesting one here.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
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8/23/2013 | 5:56:05 PM
re: Microsoft's Big Risk As Ballmer Departs: Windows Phone
I don't think the number of apps will change the situation. Windows Phone suffers from not being meaningfully different than the devices offered by two market leaders. Microsoft has to change the perception that buying a Windows Phone is like buying a Beta videotape player when everyone is going VHS.


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