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Journalist's Interview Interrupted By Attack Of Flying Genitalia

CNET interviewed Ailin Graef, aka "Anshe Chung," about her experiences amassing more than $1 million in virtual property inside the game Second Life. As is Graef's practice, she did the interview inside the game, specifically in the news bureau CNET has opened inside Second Life. What happened next is something that I'm sure never happened to Lois Lane. I'll let CNET tell it thems

CNET interviewed Ailin Graef, aka "Anshe Chung," about her experiences amassing more than $1 million in virtual property inside the game Second Life. As is Graef's practice, she did the interview inside the game, specifically in the news bureau CNET has opened inside Second Life. What happened next is something that I'm sure never happened to Lois Lane. I'll let CNET tell it themselves.


Unfortunately, as the interview was commencing, the event was attacked by a "griefer," someone intent on disrupting the proceedings. The griefer managed to assault the CNET theater for 15 minutes with--well, there's no way to say this delicately--animated flying penises.

It's not clear why the griefer attacked, but Anshe Chung is controversial to some Second Life residents for reasons such as inflexibility on land pricing, the signs she has placed in many areas of the virtual world that are visible to anyone flying overhead, and her ability to get many residents to sell their land to her.

Chung refused to continue the interview in the CNET theater but agreed to go on in her own space.

Once restarted, the interview was attacked again, and the protester even managed to crash the entire server on which Chung's theater is held.

But after restarting and bringing back the audience, Chung talked with CNET News.com for nearly three hours.