LiFi: Wireless At Light Speed Comes With Drawbacks - InformationWeek
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11/30/2015
02:06 PM
Eric Zeman
Eric Zeman
Commentary
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LiFi: Wireless At Light Speed Comes With Drawbacks

Researchers say LED light bulbs can deliver broadband speeds up to 1Gbps, but the line-of-sight requirement makes it a tough sell.

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A small company from Estonia claims to have made a breakthrough by using LED lights bulbs to transmit data at 1Gbps. LiFi, as the technology is called, relies on light to carry information from the source to devices within sight.

LiFi may be much faster than WiFi, but it has serious limitations that will likely keep it from widespread adoption.

The concept of LiFi was first proposed back in 2013. Researchers from the UK were able to transmit data at speeds up to 10Gbps using LEDs. Estonia's Velmenni says LiFi has a theoretical top speed of 224Gbps, which it has been able to recreate in its labs. More to the point, Velmenni has a commercial LiFi product (called Jugnu) that can deliver 1Gbps speeds.

LED bulbs produce constant output when fed a constant current. Varying the current can dim the light up or down. The key behind making LiFi a reality rests in the nature of LED bulbs, which are semiconductor devices. This means the current and resulting output can be altered at incredibly quick speeds. Velmenni says such rapid modulations are invisible to the naked eye, so the LED bulbs appear to shine and create light normally. Data can be embedded in the modulations, which is then read by photodetectors and converted back to regular electric current on the receiving end.

(Image: PashaIgnatov/iStockphoto)

(Image: PashaIgnatov/iStockphoto)

The speeds are truly impressive. Transmitting at 1Gbps is a generational leap over today's WiFi -- and let's face it, there's no end to the demand for fast wireless technology.

However, LiFi's range will be its biggest drawback.

Line-of-sight means the photodetectors have to be able to actually see the light in order to capture the data. In other words, LiFi doesn't pass through walls, which is one of the chief benefits of WiFi. Signal from a single WiFi hotspot can extend for hundreds of feet. LiFi will be limited to single rooms or other contained spaces.

LiFi does solve some of WiFi's woes, however, such as security. WiFi signal bleeds all over the place, and can pose a security risk (or at least permit mooching). LiFi's limited scope means it is less likely to serve as an entry point for unauthorized users. This makes it an ideal solution for some industries.

[Read Is 'Private' Enterprise WiFi Obsolete?.]

LiFi's arrival is still on the horizon. "Currently, we have designed a smart-lighting solution for an industrial environment where the data communication is done through light," said Velmenni CEO Deepak Solanki told the International Business Times. "We are also doing a pilot project with a private client where we are setting up a Li-Fi network to access the Internet in their office space." Solanki says a consumer-grade version of LiFi is three to four years away.

In other words, WiFi will continue to be the primary indoor wireless tech used by the majority of businesses and homes for years to come.

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Eric is a freelance writer for InformationWeek specializing in mobile technologies. View Full Bio
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moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
12/5/2015 | 8:33:43 AM
Good for noisy areas
Yes, line of sight is an issue, but I wonder if the LEDs can be coupled with fiber which will allow the light to go around a curve and through walls (well, same as a cable). A huge beneift of LiFi will be that it is not impacted by any RF noise as it is often encountered in production settings. Line of sight might not be an issue on the shop floor.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 9:35:17 PM
Re: Excellent first try. Go again.
It's good to see we are looking beyond the radio signals. I am wondering if someone could hold a flashlight and disrupt the connection to bring a network down. If so do we have any ways to avoid that?
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 9:32:40 PM
Re: Long distance
@tzubair – Think this is also good for point to point out door network. You could use a laser beam to project the light signals over 5miles. Some lasers have the strength of reaching about 50km. 
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 9:30:37 PM
Re: Power Required?
"I wonder how much power will be required at the remote devices, as opposed to the hub? If it is very low, it might be useful for some Internet of things applications, where small size and low power are critical"

@Gary: I am not sure about the exact power requirements, but given the technological details, it seems less power-consuming to me. The reason being the fact that the medium is using LED lights for transmission which is generally an efficient medium.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 9:30:07 PM
Re: Power Required?
@Gray_EL - I think the LEDs would consume very less power, they could also use a lens to improve the strength and distance of the beam.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 9:28:23 PM
Re: Power Required?
It's an amazing technology to wirelessly transfer at high speed. Hope they come out of the point to point barrier. 
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 9:26:04 PM
Re: Excellent first try. Go again.
"This is an impressive development. I hope to see better results in future iterations -- if it's even possible. LiFi is a very interesting concept taken on its own."

@Michelle: Interesting it indeed is. Particularly, there can be so many applications of it in the area of IoT. Recerntly, all IoT related development is taking place via Bluetooth or WiFi but to have an alternate medium in the same setting can be a very useful development.

 
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 9:24:19 PM
Long distance
I think LiFi is a useful technology when it comes to indoor transmission, but from a broader perspective, speed is an issue over the outdoor side and not so much on the indoor side. Currently, getting high-speed broadband speed via cable or wirless into a house or a building is the bottleneck. WiFi itself has speed up to 50 Mbps which is not being fully utilized at most places. So while LiFi will offer a better indoor transmission speed, I wonder how useful will that be in enhancing the overall browsing speed.
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 4:03:03 PM
Excellent first try. Go again.
This is an impressive development. I hope to see better results in future iterations -- if it's even possible. LiFi is a very interesting concept taken on its own.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2015 | 2:53:06 PM
Power Required?
I wonder how much power will be required at the remote devices, as opposed to the hub? If it is very low, it might be useful for some Internet of things applications, where small size and low power are critical.
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