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CRM For Consumer Goods

Siebel's CRM suite for the consumer packaged-goods industry is a continuation of its focus on offering tools for specific vertical markets.
Siebel Systems Inc. this week launched the latest version of its CRM suite for the consumer packaged-goods industry as it continues its focus on offering customer-relationship-management tools designed for specific vertical markets. Hitting the market just a month after founder Tom Siebel stepped down as CEO and was replaced by former IBM exec Mike Lawrie, Siebel Consumer Goods 7.7 adds several features to help makers of consumer packaged goods better manage everything from product team collaboration to trade promotion efforts.

Among the new features:

  • The ability to access brand analysis, strategy, and planning data related to a product launch in a single view, which is expected to spur improved collaboration between members of a product launch team.
  • More-effective tools for marketing directly to consumers, such as an improved ability to create targeted messaging and better integration of all marketing efforts regardless of how they reach consumers.
  • Tools for building processes for creating trade promotions that are driven by customer feedback.
  • An improved ability to give field-sales and delivery personnel information they can use to better time their merchandising, sales, and delivery efforts, theoretically reducing sales costs and increasing customer satisfaction.
  • Siebel claims more than 120 customers of its consumer-goods suite, including Bayer, Nestle USA, Procter & Gamble, Unilever, and Warner Bros. Entertainment. The company offers more than 20 CRM suites customized for individual industries.

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