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Adobe Sets Creative Suite 3 Ship Date For April

The launch is the largest in Adobe's 25-year history.

Thomas Claburn

March 27, 2007

1 Min Read

Adobe Systems today said that its Creative Suite 3 design and development software would begin shipping in April.

"Creative Suite 3 is the biggest launch in Adobe's 25-year history and a milestone for the creative industry," said Bruce Chizen, CEO of Adobe, in a statement. "This release reflects the powerful integration between Adobe and Macromedia and how our products bridge the gap between designers and developers."

Adobe is offering six configurations: Adobe Creative Suite 3 Design (Premium and Standard editions), Adobe Creative Suite 3 Web Premium and Web (Premium and Standard editions), Adobe Creative Suite 3 Production Premium, and Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection (12 updated Adobe design and development applications).

The various configurations are geared to serve design and development professionals working in print, on the Web, and in video and audio production. Depending on the bundle selected, CS3 may include Photoshop CS3, Photoshop CS3 Extended, InDesign CS3, Illustrator CS3, Flash CS3 Professional, Dreamweaver CS3, Acrobat 8 Professional, Fireworks CS3, Contribute CS3, Soundbooth CS3, Encore CS3, Bridge CS3, Premiere Pro CS3, and After Effects CS3. The various configurations also may include one or two Windows-only applications: Ultra CS3 and OnLocation CS3.

Most of the CS3 editions will be available as Universal applications for both PowerPC and Intel-based Macs and will support Microsoft Windows XP and Windows Vista. Adobe says customers using Intel-based Macs and the latest Windows hardware will see better application performance.

The estimated street price for the Adobe Creative Suite 3 Design Premium is $1,799, $1,599 for Adobe Creative Suite 3 Web Premium, $1,699 for Adobe Creative Suite 3 Production Premium, and $2,499 for Adobe Creative Suite 3 Master Collection.

About the Author(s)

Thomas Claburn

Editor at Large, Enterprise Mobility

Thomas Claburn has been writing about business and technology since 1996, for publications such as New Architect, PC Computing, InformationWeek, Salon, Wired, and Ziff Davis Smart Business. Before that, he worked in film and television, having earned a not particularly useful master's degree in film production. He wrote the original treatment for 3DO's Killing Time, a short story that appeared in On Spec, and the screenplay for an independent film called The Hanged Man, which he would later direct. He's the author of a science fiction novel, Reflecting Fires, and a sadly neglected blog, Lot 49. His iPhone game, Blocfall, is available through the iTunes App Store. His wife is a talented jazz singer; he does not sing, which is for the best.

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