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Volantis Opens Up Mobile Content Platform

The Intelligent Content Delivery system aims to make it easier to develop content for the thousands of mobile devices on the market.

Terry Sweeney

March 19, 2008

1 Min Read

Volantis Systems released code for its Mobility Server content delivery platform to the open source community Wednesday to foster content creation for the world's 350 million mobile phones.

The Guilford, U.K.-based vendor said it's releasing the code under the GNU General Public License version 3. Volantis said it's the first mobile content delivery vendor to offer its software this way, and that the move is part of the company's drive into the enterprise market.

Its Intelligent Content Delivery software contains more than 1.2 million lines of code and represents seven years of development. The vendor made available its Mobility Server as a free download last November. By going the open source route now, it hopes to tap into the broader development community to build upon its work.

"The mobile Web is the next major growth point for online communications, but the ever-growing variety of mobile devices on the market makes it difficult to develop powerful Web applications," the company said in a statement. "Volantis Mobility Server makes it cheap and easy for companies to create this content and distribute it to the more than 5,000 mobile devices currently on the market."

And there's some evidence that big companies are more receptive to using open source products. Spanish carrier Telefonica recently created the OpenMovilForum, for example. "Open source software and independent developers are quickly becoming the most important movement in telecommunications industry," said Luis Almansa, a project manager for Telefonica.

Volantis has launched a Web site with information on open source Mobility Server, to allow contributor input and to help developers get started in the new environment.

About the Author(s)

Terry Sweeney

Contributing Editor

Terry Sweeney is a Los Angeles-based writer and editor who has covered technology, networking, and security for more than 20 years. He was part of the team that started Dark Reading and has been a contributor to The Washington Post, Crain's New York Business, Red Herring, Network World, InformationWeek and Mobile Sports Report.

In addition to information security, Sweeney has written extensively about cloud computing, wireless technologies, storage networking, and analytics. After watching successive waves of technological advancement, he still prefers to chronicle the actual application of these breakthroughs by businesses and public sector organizations.

Sweeney is also the founder and chief jarhead of Paragon Jams, which specializes in small-batch jams and preserves for adults.

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