Here are some highlights of what's going on, although names, dates, and details will have to await conversations and press releases this week... Teradata hopes to leapfrog Greenplum in its "Enterprise Data Cloud" strategy. This is only fair, in that Greenplum lifted the idea from Teradata and eBay in the first place...

Curt Monash, Contributor

October 20, 2009

2 Min Read

Here are some highlights of what's going on, although names, dates, and details will have to await conversations and press releases this week.

  • Teradata is productizing "private cloud," under names including "Teradata Enterprise Analytics Cloud," "Teradata Agile Analytics Cloud," and "Teradata Elastic Mart Builder." I.e., Teradata hopes to leapfrog Greenplum in its "Enterprise Data Cloud" strategy. This is only fair, in that Greenplum lifted the idea from Teradata and eBay in the first place. It also provides major support for what I think is an extremely sensible trend. Give or take issues of who announces and ships what a couple months before or after a competitor, my early thinking is that the main differences between Greenplum and Teradata in this regard will be:

    • Virtual as opposed to just physical data marts, based on robust workload management software. (Advantage: Teradata)

      Pricing, deployment options. (Advantage: Greenplum) Features that don't directly relate to enterprise/private cloud. (Advantage: Either, often Teradata.)

    Teradata is generally strengthening its data movement technology, e.g. for making various appliances work in sync. I'm not too clear yet on the details of that. I think this is what Teradata's phrase "ecosystem management" refers to. Teradata is (pre-)announcing - at least as a statement of direction - an appliance based on solid-state drives (SSDs). I've thought for a while that Teradata was a leader in thinking through the issues around solid-state memory in data warehousing, so it makes sense that they're among the leaders in actually coming to market as well. I plan to say more after meeting with, e.g., Carson Schmidt. Teradata has achieved a 300%ish speed-up in geospatial processing. I gather this is largely a byproduct of the parallel analytics work Teradata did around strengthening its SAS integration. However, there don't seem to be a lot of Teradata geospatial users yet. Teradata Express, Teradata's free Windows-based crippleware, is being ported to Amazon EC2 and VMware as well. Presumably to avoid cannibalizing Teradata product sales, there are quite a few limitations on Teradata Express, including system capacity, database size, and "no production use." Teradata continues to extend its optimizations to handle queries issued by business intelligence tools. Previously, the focus of what Teradata discussed in this regard was query rewrite. But soon automatic recommendation and creation of Aggregate Join Indexes - i.e.., materialized views - will be included as well. Here are some highlights of what's going on, although names, dates, and details will have to await conversations and press releases this week... Teradata hopes to leapfrog Greenplum in its "Enterprise Data Cloud" strategy. This is only fair, in that Greenplum lifted the idea from Teradata and eBay in the first place...

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About the Author(s)

Curt Monash

Contributor

Curt Monash has been an industry, product, and/or stock analyst since 1981, specializing in the areas of database management, application development tools, online services, and analytic technologies

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