3D Printing Reshapes Healthcare - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Healthcare // Mobile & Wireless
News
2/20/2014
11:00 AM
Alison Diana
Alison Diana
Slideshows

3D Printing Reshapes Healthcare

Printed livers, ears, hands, and eyes? 3D printing can change and save lives.
2 of 13

Broken bonesForget that heavy plaster cast. No need to wrap it in plastic when you shower, or grab a back scratcher for an inconvenient itch. That's the plan, at least, of Jake Evill, designer of the Cortex Cast, which uses the patient's x-ray and a 3D scan of the injured limb to generate a 3D cast that meets the individual's specifications. One side of the exoskeletal cast is open so the patient can put it on. Once secured, built-in fasteners hold it in place. Currently, a 3D cast takes about three hours to print. Although old-fashioned plaster casts take less than 10 minutes for a doctor to prepare, they do take up to 72 hours to set, Evill told Dezeen. Cortex is seeking funding.
(Image: Jake Evill and Cortex Cast Systems)

Broken bones
Forget that heavy plaster cast. No need to wrap it in plastic when you shower, or grab a back scratcher for an inconvenient itch. That's the plan, at least, of Jake Evill, designer of the Cortex Cast, which uses the patient's x-ray and a 3D scan of the injured limb to generate a 3D cast that meets the individual's specifications. One side of the exoskeletal cast is open so the patient can put it on. Once secured, built-in fasteners hold it in place. Currently, a 3D cast takes about three hours to print. Although old-fashioned plaster casts take less than 10 minutes for a doctor to prepare, they do take up to 72 hours to set, Evill told Dezeen. Cortex is seeking funding.

(Image: Jake Evill and Cortex Cast Systems)

2 of 13
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
dalyBT
50%
50%
dalyBT,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/14/2016 | 7:27:21 AM
Re: 3D printing technologies in medicine
Google brought me here, sign that here's something valuable people area talking about. And after few seconds spend here - it is indeed.

I just want to add my 5 cents to the subject of how 3d printing is getting medicine to a new level. The best news is that additive manufacturing has made its entry in almost all domains and its helpful. Nobody even imagined that it can go so far.

I'm happy every time i read about new 3d printed accessories meant to help people struggle with their health problems. I think we the new trend of having a 3d printer a home, there will be more 3d printing software available for beginners who want to enter this vast world.

There are plenty of 3d printing designs for free or paid that are just few clicks away from us. And what's really good is that their quality is above expectation, even you get them for free.
Alison_Diana
50%
50%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/22/2014 | 8:51:14 AM
Re: 3D printing technologies in medicine
Thanks for the additional link, @Mike. I tell you, every week it seems you'll find a new article about different ways in which researchers or doctors are using 3D printing for healthcare. I can only imagine where we'll be in another 12 to 24 months as materials (the actual "ink" used to generate organs, blood, etc.) improve. Very, very exciting.
MikeC507
100%
0%
MikeC507,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2014 | 8:08:14 PM
3D printing technologies in medicine
There is a really interesting topic. It is amazing how new technologies such as 3d printing/bioprinting can help people to fight deceases. You may find several articles related to this topic at 3DPrintingFromScratch.com
Kristin Burnham
50%
50%
Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
3/5/2014 | 9:00:34 PM
Re: Love the skull
Healthcare is such a natural fit for 3D printing, and the uses are incredible. Looking forward to watching this industry grow.
Alison_Diana
50%
50%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
3/3/2014 | 5:26:55 PM
Re: 3D Bioprinting
That is amazing. These doctors and researchers are doing an incredible job of saving lives and giving hope where once there was none. Imagine what it will be like in another decade.
telescoper
100%
0%
telescoper,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2014 | 7:19:50 AM
3D Bioprinting
There is a team at Swansea University in Wales - UK, who are using this process to make arteries and tracheal tissue, watch the video here  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqSPIYssdwE
3DPrintWise
50%
50%
3DPrintWise,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/23/2014 | 6:21:44 PM
Where next for 3D printing in medicine
Without doubt one of the most important areas where 3D printing can make a contributution is in medicine. And it is not just about the potnetial of making 3D printed organs. In the not too distant future techniques will be available to do 3D printing directly on a patient. Expereiments have already begun on repairing minor wounds. In other words repair to organs and tissue where an additive process is needed. For our part, we don't perceive a market place in medicine like 3DPrintWise but on the other hand why not. Cosmetic surgery for example is big business and a market could well develop. The mind starts to boggle.
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
2/23/2014 | 5:02:25 AM
Re: Love the skull
Alison, 

It's a matter of time. Organ transplants depending on organ donors will one day be thing of the past. And with it, many other doors will open to improve health condition and life expectansy.

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
50%
50%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Author
2/23/2014 | 4:33:33 AM
3D-printed heart
David, 

This is no science fiction. :) 

"A team of cardiovascular scientists has announced it will be able to 3D print a whole heart from the recipients' own cells within a decade.

Bioprinting is advancing quite fast. There is a special bioprinter under construction for this, and it will be able to print a heart in three hours. Isn't it fascinating?

-Susan  
LincolnH4wk
50%
50%
LincolnH4wk,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/21/2014 | 5:57:25 PM
Bladder research
What I don't understand is why Wake Forest does not produce more bladders if it already worked 10 years ago. This is intolerable if you look at the patients who desperately need it.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Slideshows
IT Careers: 12 Job Skills in Demand for 2020
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  10/1/2019
Commentary
Enterprise Guide to Multi-Cloud Adoption
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  9/27/2019
Commentary
5 Ways CIOs Can Better Compete to Recruit Top Tech Talent
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  10/2/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
Data Science and AI in the Fast Lane
This IT Trend Report will help you gain insight into how quickly and dramatically data science is influencing how enterprises are managed and where they will derive business success. Read the report today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll