Facebook recently redesigned the page you see when you first log in. The redesign is proving to be controversial -- more than 1.7 million users have signed up for the <a href="http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=21195574231">Petition Against The New Facebook</a> group on Facebook. I guess that makes me part of a small minority -- I like the new Facebook. Sure, the user interface still needs a lot of tuning, but Facebook has definitely moved in the right direction.

Mitch Wagner, California Bureau Chief, Light Reading

March 24, 2009

2 Min Read

Facebook recently redesigned the page you see when you first log in. The redesign is proving to be controversial -- more than 1.7 million users have signed up for the Petition Against The New Facebook group on Facebook. I guess that makes me part of a small minority -- I like the new Facebook. Sure, the user interface still needs a lot of tuning, but Facebook has definitely moved in the right direction.The new home page streamlines Facebook's front door (so to speak). When you log in, you get a nice, fat column in the middle of the page, showing all your friends' updates in reverse chronological order. Status updates, links, photos, and video all show up in the same stream. And Facebook consolidated the different tools for uploading photos, video, and text messages into a single place: The status box is now the place for all those different kinds of updates.

Sure, there are problems. But it takes more than one day to fix a huge hairball of a site like Facebook. The new changes are a great start.

Well, that's my opinion. But, apparently, 1.7 million Facebook users disagree with me.

Love it or hate it, you'll find the new Facebook confusing when you first encounter it. That's why I've prepared this guide to the new Facebook, with the help of the TechWeb TV team. Note: We created this video last week and already a small part of it near the end of the video is out-of-date -- updates the fan pages now do show up on fans' news feeds.

What do you think of the new Facebook design?

Learn more about Web 2.0 at TechWeb's Web 2.0 Expo, March 31-April 3. Join us. (registration required).

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About the Author(s)

Mitch Wagner

California Bureau Chief, Light Reading

Mitch Wagner is California bureau chief for Light Reading.

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