One of the biggest obstacles to fighting <a href="http://www.informationweek.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=177102202">cybercrime</a> is the corporations themselves. Never mind that many still don't heed the advice of their IT departments and make the appropriate investments in security. Once a crime occurs--be it hacking, identity theft, stolen equipment, or logic bombs--these same companies notoriously tend to bury their heads--and the news--in the sand. Many don't tell the cops, they don't t

Patricia Keefe, Contributor

June 6, 2006

14 Min Read

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: A Data Bill Of Rights
2. Today's Top Story
    - Nightmare On Wall Street: Prosecution Witness Describes 'Chaos' In UBS PaineWebber Attack
    Related Stories
    - PaineWebber Systems Admin Faces Trial For Computer Sabotage
    - Security Cleanup Costs Much More Than Encryption: Gartner
3. Breaking News
    - Reliability Survey: Windows Servers Beat Linux Boxes
    - Microsoft Tackles Enterprise Messaging Security
    - Microsoft Live Labs Debuts Security Services
    - Intel Gives Sneak Preview Of Core Duo
    - HP Rolls Out First Dual-Core 64-Bit Notebook
    - Groups Protest Proposed AT&T-BellSouth Merger
    - Google Spreadsheets Set To Debut
    - Plastic Missed In Factory Cooks MacBooks
    - Press Releases More Popular Than Reported News
    - IBM Has The Tools For Digging Deeper Into Data
    - Yahoo Plans MyWeb Update
    - Venture Capital Companies To Acquire CRM Vendor Onyx
4. Grab Bag
    - Slide Show: Bidders, Beam Me Up (BusinessWeek)
    - Watching The Snoops (BusinessWeek)
    - The Browser: Truth And Rumors From The Tech World (CNNMoney.com)
5. In Depth: Oh, India!
    - Blog: How 6 Billion IBM Dollars Helped Chase Apple Out Of India
    - Blog: Everyone's Waking Up To The Importance Of India To IBM
    - Motorola Plans Manufacturing Plant In India
    - IBM To Invest $6 Billion In India To Increase Offshore IT Services Offerings
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Report: Windows More Reliable Than Linux, But Unix Beats All
7. White Papers
    - Event-Driven Services Fuel The Agile Supply Chain
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"If people never did silly things, nothing intelligent would ever get done." -- Ludwig Wittgenstein


1. Editor's Note: A Data Bill Of Rights
One of the biggest obstacles to fighting cybercrime is the corporations themselves. Never mind that many still don't heed the advice of their IT departments and make the appropriate investments in security. Once a crime occurs—be it hacking, identity theft, stolen equipment or logic bombs—these same companies notoriously tend to bury their heads, and the news, in the sand. Many don't tell the cops, they don't tell their partners, and they especially don't tell their victimized customers, employees, alumni, or applicants. They keep it very quiet for as long as they can.

The excuses are always like these: It costs too much to notify people, they don't want the bad publicity, or as in the recent Hotels.com breach, a couple of months are needed to figure out what was lost on the auditor's laptop. (Don't these companies back up their systems? Don't they know what their employees have access to?)

Companies that allow employees to flout their security policies, or worse, that fail to enact basic or reasonable safeguards to deter cybercrimes, deserve every speck of bad publicity they get.

If a company is stupid enough to snail mail unencrypted drives containing sensitive data or apathetic enough to routinely allow employees to bring home laptops stuffed with sensitive data or unwilling to test its own system security or commits any of a dozen more breaches of common sense, then a little time spent squirming under the harsh glare of the spotlight might be just what it needs.

Which is why I was glad to see a judge reject UBS Wealth Management USA's transparent attempt yesterday to bar reporters from covering the trial of a disgruntled employee who allegedly brought down two-thirds of its network.

To the credit of UBS Wealth Management (PaineWebber to most of us), it did call in the Secret Service after a forensic team spent a couple of weeks working the problem and it became obvious that deliberate sabotage was involved. And it is working with law enforcement officials.

But there will be other similar trials, where companies with sloppier security procedures will try to prosecute, but from behind a curtain. Judges should not let that happen.

We should also be pressing for more immediate information when these breaches occur and for companies to do right by all potential victims. In fact, since we are in an age when A) more and more data is being collected by more and more entities—including the government—and shared with God knows whom, and B) data theft is accelerating, what we really need are two things:

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