Shady politicians and government workers, beware. Pepperdine University last week launched the Murray S. Craig Digital Democracy Lab to help spot improper conduct on the job. When someone submits a name, the lab uses artificial-intelligence apps from eNeuralNet and donated hardware from IBM to analyze records such as minutes, applications, and permits. The impartial system presents data it deems relevant ...

InformationWeek Staff, Contributor

December 8, 2001

1 Min Read

Shady politicians and government workers, beware. Pepperdine University last week launched the Murray S. Craig Digital Democracy Lab to help spot improper conduct on the job. When someone submits a name, the lab uses artificial-intelligence apps from eNeuralNet and donated hardware from IBM to analyze records such as minutes, applications, and permits. The impartial system presents data it deems relevant in an easy-to-read format so users can spot trends, though it draws no conclusions, eNeuralNet CEO Thomas Kemp Jr. says. "It's absolutely usable to find corruption in government, or at least improper activities that warrant further investigation."

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