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How The InformationWeek 500 Are Chosen

Our editors consider quantitative and qualitative factors to select top innovators.

Heather Vallis

September 5, 2012

1 Min Read

Now in its 24th year, the InformationWeek 500 recognizes business technology teams that have made a notable improvement to how their companies operate. The InformationWeek 500 is open to U.S. companies with revenue of $250 million or more (or subsidiaries with $250 million or more in revenue). This year, we made a few exceptions to allow companies just below that revenue that are highly IT-intensive.

To be considered for the IW 500, companies complete a rigorous application on their business technology strategies. The ranking process is quantitative and qualitative, whereby applicants earn points based a questionnaire and based on the achievements they outline in an essay submission. Applications are evaluated by a panel of InformationWeek editors. The survey data is aggregated across all InformationWeek 500 companies and by industry; individual responses are kept confidential and individual company data is never disclosed without permission.

The 2013 InformationWeek 500 application period opens in December. You can register for next year at informationweek.com/500/preregister.htm. For more information, visit the InformationWeek 500 Resource Center. Send questions regarding the process to [email protected]. The 2012 InformationWeek 500 report, which includes all the aggregated survey data, can be downloaded free with registration at informationweek.com/reports/2012/500.

Go to the main story:
IW 500 Data Shows How IT Rules Have Changed

Go to the 2012 InformationWeek 500 homepage

Go to the 2012 InformationWeek 500 homepage

About the Author(s)

Heather Vallis

Contributor

Heather Vallis is Managing Editor, Research at InformationWeek. Prior to joining the InformationWeek editorial staff in November 2007, she was Senior Research Manager for UBM Tech’s Business Technology Group, and managed sales and marketing research for several publications including Network Computing, Intelligent Enterprise, and Secure Enterprise. Before coming to UBM Tech in 1996, she worked for Thurston Arthritis Research Center at UNC-Chapel Hill and was on the editorial staff of the medical journal, Arthritis Care & Research. Heather holds a BA in Political Science from Boston College and was on the American Business Media Research Committee in 2007.

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