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Free Money: 10 Top Linux Accounting Apps

Many would-be Linux users lament a lack of quality accounting software for the open-source OS. The real problem, perhaps, is that they just aren't looking for them.

Matthew McKenzie

December 16, 2008

2 Min Read

Many would-be Linux users lament a lack of quality accounting software for the open-source OS. The real problem, perhaps, is that they just aren't looking for them.Earlier this year, TechRepublic blogger Jack Wallen poked holes in the assertion that Linux is a black hole when it comes to quality financial-management and accounting tools: "Many people dont realize the wealth of applications that are available for Linux. I am asked all the time about X and/or Y application on Windows and whether theres an equivalent on Linux. Most of the time the answer is yes.

The arena of finance is no exception. Plenty of outstanding financial applications are available for the Linux operating system. From personal finance to business finance, there is an application for nearly every need. Lets take a look at the top Linux financial applications."

Some of the tools on the list, such as Gnucash and SQL-Ledger, are available free of charge under open-source licenses. Others, such as Quasar Accounting, are open-source tools that require users to pay a licensing fee (remember: "open-source" does not always mean "no-cost!). Still others, such as Moneydance, are Linux-compatible proprietary applications.

Which tool works best for you depends upon your business needs. Some of these products are geared more towards individual users but work just fine for SOHO businesses. Others, such as Appgen MyBooks or Nolapro, scale quite nicely for larger businesses. Most of the tools on the list support key small-business features such as double-entry accounting, financial reporting, payroll management, and much more. And some function as full-scale, database-driven client-server financial management products.

By the way, the list also mentions Crossover Office, which gives Linux users who still require access to Quicken or Microsoft Money the ability to have the best of both worlds.

If a perceived dearth of quality financial management tools is the only problem keeping your company away from Linux, you owe it to yourself to check out these products. When you review the list, don't forget to read the comments, as well; several mention additional Linux-friendly accounting apps that might be worth a closer look.

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