Outsourcing No Threat To Tech Jobs, Survey Says - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // IT Strategy
Commentary
9/19/2006
11:20 AM
Paul McDougall
Paul McDougall
Commentary
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
Building Security for the IoT
Nov 09, 2017
In this webcast, experts discuss the most effective approaches to securing Internet-enabled system ...Read More>>

Outsourcing No Threat To Tech Jobs, Survey Says

Unemployed computer professionals are quick to blame their situation on the so-called offshoring of U.S. tech jobs to low-wage countries like India and China. But a new survey of corporate CIOs shows that spending on foreign tech labor by American businesses is miniscule.

Unemployed computer professionals are quick to blame their situation on the so-called offshoring of U.S. tech jobs to low-wage countries like India and China. But a new survey of corporate CIOs shows that spending on foreign tech labor by American businesses is miniscule.Only 3.3% of 2007 corporate IT budgets are allocated to the funding of offshore outsourcing programs, according to a new survey of 140 chief information officers and other tech execs. By contrast, tech chiefs are setting aside, on average, 33% of their budgets for in-house staff, the survey says. The survey was released Tuesday by the Society for Information Management.

The survey also revealed more good news for technology professionals. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents will maintain or increase their levels of IT staffing in 2007.

This information is consistent with other reports we're seeing here at InformationWeek that points to a robust market for tech labor. All the facts indicate that offshoring is having only a minimal impact on IT jobs, despite the histrionics of Lou Dobbs and other scaremongers who never bother to look at the numbers.

I talk to CIOs and execs on the tech vendor side almost daily. They all have one problem in common: They can't find enough qualified computer pros to fill out their staffs. Outsourcing, while presently limited, is growing. But that growth is being driven as much by companies' inability to find competent domestic programmers as it is by the desire to cut costs.

Some may disagree with that premise, but an increasing amount of data says otherwise.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
2017 State of IT Report
In today's technology-driven world, "innovation" has become a basic expectation. IT leaders are tasked with making technical magic, improving customer experience, and boosting the bottom line -- yet often without any increase to the IT budget. How are organizations striking the balance between new initiatives and cost control? Download our report to learn about the biggest challenges and how savvy IT executives are overcoming them.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll