IT Salaries: 8 Cold Hard Facts - InformationWeek

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IT Salaries: 8 Cold Hard Facts
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DDURBIN1
50%
50%
DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/23/2014 | 9:38:44 AM
Re: No training, no new skills?
@SaneIT, You would think this to be true, generalization allows for better management and leadership opportunities and to a curtain extent this is true.  But here's the thing, there are fewer IT leadership positions now than 10 years ago and 10 years ago there were fewer positions than ten years prior (20 years ago) do to mergers and acquisitions.  There are fewer entities needing IT leadership each year as there is no end to mergers and acquisitions.  It's also crippling the job market in other areas too while lessening competition and reducing choice but that's another story.  In the leadership positions that are left if you don't have decades of experience in that industry you are not wanted.  To add insult to injury by the time one gets the diversity and industry experience you are at an age you are no longer desirable as there is age discrimination out there.  Add the fact that many IT leadership positions still go to non-technology individuals the CEOs or CFOs favor.  Lastly every IT leadership position has the requirement that you are already in an IT leadership position.  So how do you get an IT leadership job if everybody requires you are already in one. It is a tuff career to gain advancement. 
DDURBIN1
50%
50%
DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2014 | 10:33:31 AM
Re: No training, no new skills?
Welcome to the club.  The first and second generation IT folks, myself included, were groomed in this manner.  It was thought best to diversify and for a time that was an advantage.  Being a generalist was great back then but not now.  Just like in health care, specialization is now more desired and in most cases actually required.  Do you want a foot doctor working on your heart?  That's the way its become in many IT professionial positions.  Businesses don't want a Cicso Technican working on their CRM as the application lead.  They want a CRM professional.  As an IT "generalist" they don't want you working as either even though you may have experience in one or both.
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
5/20/2014 | 9:06:03 PM
No training, no new skills?
The fact that only 15% of IT managers emphasize training tells me something I have always suspected: it is extremely hard to be a generalist in IT. Once you're identified with a skill, you may be typecast, even though you yearn to break out, try other things. Or perhaps training in IT comes via on the job experience. If you dare to try it and can succeed, you're in.
Laurianne
100%
0%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/20/2014 | 5:28:38 PM
Re: Suprising how few desire training
Many East Coast respondents; we know those salaries on the coasts can be higher. Anyone else reading these numbers and thinking it is time to look for greener pastures?
Laurianne
IW Pick
100%
0%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/20/2014 | 1:36:15 PM
Re: "Gender Gap"?
The gender gap in pay exists across many industries in the US for several reasons, but there is one factor that women themselves can change. Study after study shows that men ask for higher salaries in the first place, then ask for raises more often. Women also take longer than men to reach for the next rung on the career ladder. CIOs like Wal-Mart's Karenann Terrell will tell you that they are trying to mentor women in their IT organizations to fight these instincts. See her advice, here.
DDURBIN1
50%
50%
DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/20/2014 | 12:31:13 PM
Suprising how few desire training
I wonder what the average age is of the respondants for each position.   Lack of skills will be the number one reason they get booted from their job as they get older.  Companies don't invest in IT people much anymore, "out with the old in with the new" IT personnel strategy is preferred by most fortune 500.  It would also be interesting to know how many people are 40 and over or 50 and over for each job.  Based on personal experience and past history I bet very few.


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