National Health Database: Good Medicine Or Privacy Nightmare? - InformationWeek

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National Health Database: Good Medicine Or Privacy Nightmare?
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progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 7:57:06 PM
Re: Sounds like a fairy tale more than a nightmare
Slightly off topic, but I once interviewed someone for a technical position in my company, which writes software for hospitals.  This candidate was an intern from Germany in the US working for a large EMR.  I was explaining to him how our software collects all of the information from the patient at registration (insurance cards, driver license, etc).  He kept looking at me like I had three heads and when I was done told me in Germany they just go into a hospital with their ID card which has their info barcoded on since their healthcare is run by the government.  It was eye opening for both of us.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 2:23:54 PM
Re: Interoperability is positive, but accurate patient ID is the linchpin
I'm excited about patient use of biometrics and would love to know if any developers or providers are piloting this approach. Sure, it won't be 100% accurate or safe; nothing is! But what a big step forward this could be and what a simple, cost-effective way to improve security without adding onerous complexity. I'd love that option for a patient portal. It would definitely encourage me to access it and improve my comfort level with the security.
Alison_Diana
IW Pick
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 2:20:45 PM
Re: Another Epic Government Fail to Screw Americans
Those are great points, Susan. Tackling the first, I wholeheartedly agree that there's a huge difference between doing something because you have to and doing something because it's integral to your being, to your corporate philosophy, and to the way you think about your customers -- or, in healthcare's case, patients. It's also how you think about employees. After all, the same tools, technologies, and processes that protect (or don't) your customers protect your employee data. And that might not be good. When talking to a CISO/CSO who really gets how vital security is to an operation, who is viewed as key to the c-suite, you see the value s/he (usually he) provides. One reason: That exec educates other c-levels and board members about why security is vital, about the carrot/stick, and how it requires everything from ongoing education to technologies.

Regarding your second point, JP Morgan obviously is not spending enough on security -- and it is a relatively tiny amount of money, relative to the huge earnings it boasts. I am for small government, in general, and would never argue for regulations demanding a set percentage of spending on security. But you'd certainly hope some board members would be savvy enough to recognize that's nowhere near enough. Until shareholders and board members are held liable -- especially if they are on record blocking CSO/CIO recommendations for X tech or Y process -- then fines against the company, which invariably get passed along to consumers, won't do a thing. We really need bigger, sharper teeth that - like Sarbanes-Oxley - put people's names, not company names, on the line.

 

 

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/28/2014 | 1:54:37 PM
Re: Interoperability is positive, but accurate patient ID is the linchpin
@M2SYS: Thanks for bringing up something I hadn't considerd -- two very different applicaitons for biometrics there. As patients themselves increasingly use elecronic health records, Biometrics could be an added tool in keeping patient data secure, especially since some smartpones now incorporate fingerprint readers as part of the authentication process.

Has the use of biometrics been effective in the clinical uses you've cited? Are you aware of cases in which the wrong playeres were able to gain access even with the biometrics in place.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
8/28/2014 | 1:44:47 PM
Re: Another Epic Government Fail to Screw Americans
@Alison: It seems to me that the response to customers is designed to merely meet what is required by legisltation, as opposed to really keeping the best interests of the customers in mind. What shocked me the most about today's bank breach news is this statement in a Bloomberg News article: JPMorgan Chase spends about $200 million each year to protect itself from cyber attacks, Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon wrote in a April 2013 letter to shareholders.

For a financial institution that earns billions dealing with our $$, doesn't $200 million a year seem like an awfully small amount to spend on security?

And, if a bank is only spending that much, how much can we possible expect healthcare providers or for-profit health insurance companies to spend?
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 9:48:03 AM
Re: Good medicine or privacy nightmare!
Why will big data cause healthcare costs to go up, @tekedge? Is it because some patients might not tell doctors the truth or may not disclose everything, fearful that some factor could end up in their "permanent record"? I see that point; as consumers get more educated about how permanent and far-reaching everything they tell their doctors is becoming, they could well become more leery of admitting to that extra glass of wine, that occasional marijuana use, or that tendency to eat six bowls of ice cream on Sundays.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 9:45:35 AM
Re: Another Epic Government Fail to Screw Americans
Unfortunately I think you're right. Just this morning we heard about the breach at JP Morgan (and other banks). For one, I was furious that the "other banks" were yet to be named. For another, we have to rely on JP Morgan assuring us that everything's fine. Well, somehow that's not really too comforting. And just yesterday -- more than a week after it went public and more than a month after it knew about the breach -- Community Health Systems began notifying affected patients. There's a real disconnect here.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 9:43:32 AM
Re: hours?
It's cumulative, @Joe. If you see multiple doctors and go for multiple tests in one year, you do spend hours filling out forms. And if you have kids, then double (or more) that time. So yes, figure about 15-20 minutes per doctor and that time quickly adds up if you unfortunately have to see more than one or two new physicians, test centers, or specialists per year.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 9:41:44 AM
Re: Good medicine or privacy nightmare!
I think many organizations that use or create big data have integrity. My personal fear is the start of the big-data brokers, companies that simply vacuum up health information for packaging and resale. As we see that business model flourish, there'll be more line-fudging, more intermingling of other data (read consumer shopping and demographics), IMHO, and that could lead to more easily identifiable information floating around. That, at least, is what bothers me. That's why I want more oversight on de-identification and anonymization of data and usage. That's just my personal opinion, not a particularly scientific one!
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
8/27/2014 | 11:52:44 PM
Re: Another Epic Government Fail to Screw Americans
I think data breaches have attracted so many headlines these days -- and have become so (unfortunately) common -- that data breaches don't even have that much effect on a company's stock any more unless the breach is especially significant (think Target or Adobe levels).
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