Google, Amazon, Apple Dominate Most Desirable Companies List - InformationWeek

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Google, Amazon, Apple Dominate Most Desirable Companies List
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kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2015 | 2:08:33 PM
Did they do their homework?
I wonder if the reason the top five are in the top five is simply branding. Everyone knows those companies and everyone knows they are looking for people. But how many of those people that listed those companies in their top five have done any research on the salary, benefits, average work hours, or other working conditions there. You may dream of working for amazon or google, right until you get there and realize that the company culture and management style isn't for you. I worked for a fortune 500, probably not anywhere on the list, but management styles varied widely from manager to manager, enough so that the team I was was on was considered the most desirable team because we had a great manager who understood the IT part of our job and understood we were professionals and could get the job done if shw gave us the tools and got out of our way.People on other teams griped...alot. Just becasue they have the most moeny to fling about does not mean you really want to work there, or work there under certain people.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
3/30/2015 | 1:45:34 PM
Re: Two Comments...
@progman2000- i don't know how you missed it, but I'm glad you found it. I think Pachable is fantastic. I think it makes way more sense than LinkedIn. I've been approached many times on LinkedIn by recruiters with jobs I had no interest in at all. Poachable is a much more sensible way to handle the recruiting process when someone already has a job they like. If you set the bar, the recruiter knows immediately if the job can get over the bar.

And it is nice to know you aren't going anywhere. One of my favorite things about some of my recent job posts is we've gotten to see what makes people happy with their jobs. Hopefully it will help others be happy, too.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Ninja
3/30/2015 | 11:39:03 AM
Re: Most Desirable
In my opinion it's very difficult to balance bosses and co-workers. Therefore it is important to have a balance among them.    
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
3/29/2015 | 10:11:51 AM
Two Comments...
First, how did I miss that last post on Poachable?  That is pretty cool, I am going to go check that out.  I think that is probably a huge demographic right now (employed and not really looking), good on these guys for picking up on that.

Second, I am the definition of the Careerbuilder statistics.  I am not going anywhere because (1) I like my pay (2) I like my coworkers and (3) perfect work/life balance.  And I work for a company that currently has 12 employers.  I know the knee jerk reaction is to want to work at one of these tech monsters that are all the rage, but frankly, unless they are doubling my salary (which they wouldn't), I can't see it being any more than a huge hassle.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
3/29/2015 | 7:47:27 AM
Re: Most Desirable
@David: Most top companies have horrible bosses because that is why they get selected: they are picky and perfectionists, as they claim to be, but, in my experience these bosses are nothing but hindrance to smooth working of a floor. 
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
3/29/2015 | 7:38:23 AM
Re: Most Desirable
@ChrisMurphy: Most people do that kind of a deduction based on the average salary these companies are willing to pay, and that is the only factor. Working for the top 5 mentioned companies is prestigious, true, but most of these companies, excepting Google and in some cases Apple, have delicately changed their inside workings to sap the life out of employees because of the high pay. 
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
3/29/2015 | 7:36:07 AM
Re: Most Desirable
Amazon is a poachable company? It should be pulled down from rank 3. Amazon has had a terrible inside management for years and they don't improve it because they follow a rule "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". I don't think people understand that Amazon pays high packages but it has got so many problems! I have listed a few:
  • Maintenance work - I believe it is the exact opposite here. There is lots of maintenance work. Teams dissolve and the components move from one team to another(at least from what I have seen). Legacy code with no documentation is a pain in the ass. No time is given for learning/training and all everyone does is just trying to make things work.
  • Cheap politics-  I think there is no dearth of politics here. Smelling it takes a bit of art. Most engineers being fresh out of college are too naive to understand it.
  • Perfection - You must be kidding right?
  • Work-life balance - I don't think such a thing exists here.
  • Fast and Dynamic Code changes - True. Let me give you a valid scenario- You have been working on something for 3-4 months. You come to office on one fine morning and guess what!! The project is scraped, the business requirements have changed and you are screwed.
  • Start-up culture - The only thing that bears any resemblance to a start up is poor infrastructure and facilities. 


On the other hand you can find smart asses and techno-freaks, if that turns you on.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
3/24/2015 | 5:57:04 PM
Re: Most Desirable
@Chris- I think that's because prestige without the other stuff doesn't matter, right? The thing about Pachable is that people are making the assumption that salary and benefits and all of that will be right. If they weren't, the person wouldn't contact them through Poachable. So once you've got that, the interesting work and the prestige rise to the top. And for IT folks, I think they often go hand-in-hand. If a non-IT pro said to a random stranger "I work at Facebook" the response would be all about the person's feelings about Facebook. If an IT Pro says to another IT Pro "I work at Facebook" the response will be an enthusiastic "Oh wow, what do you do there?" Because the assumption is that there's a lot of interesting IT work going on even if they hate the social network. So the prestige and the work, in my opinion, are linked.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2015 | 3:05:24 PM
Re: Most Desirable
Prestige or reputation of employer came in dead last when we asked what was most important to IT pros about their job, in our annual InformationWeek Salary Survey. Just 6% of staff and 8% of managers cite that as among their top seven factors, out of a list of about 20 factors. 

That said, the factors that do matter are pay, stable company, benefits, doing important work, being recognized for good work -- and these companies have a reputation for delivering on many of those.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
3/24/2015 | 2:17:58 PM
Re: Most Desirable
@jastroff- Interesting question. I'd assume that the list was less tech oriented. Probably more finance oriented. Goldman Sachs was probably number one. I'd also assume companies like Proctor and Gamble which was once considered the most trustworthy companny in the world
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