Microsoft at 40: 5 Successes, 5 Failures - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Comments
Microsoft at 40: 5 Successes, 5 Failures
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 4   >   >>
mejiac
50%
50%
mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
4/14/2015 | 9:49:23 AM
Re: 40 years of leassons learned
@Kelly22,

Spot On!

I am curious to see is Windows 10 will address any specific needs at the enterprise level, to the point that companies won't wait 5 years to migrate.

The transition from Windows XP to Windows 7 was slow at best, and most companies only migrated because Microsoft decided to pull the plug on XP support, so not sure what strategy will be implement for Windows 10
TerryB
50%
50%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
4/13/2015 | 2:00:12 PM
Active Directory
I'm a little surprised this wasn't mentioned in article or comments so far. Perhaps because it's not really a product but a service running on Windows products. But I would argue in enterprise space, it's the single business reason Macs and Linux has not made more headway into the Windows workstations.

I also think some of it's other enterprise products like SQL Server, Windows Server and Exchange have to be considered unqualified success stories. But I think list was more based on consumer side of things, who would never use any of these things (that they knew of). It is really this enterprise side of things that will keep MS relevant for forseeable future, not the consumer market. You could argue now that Xbox is their biggest consumer product, I'm not sure how many pure consumers (no work use at all) are still buying Windows machines. Their smartphones have replaced what consumers used to buy Windows machines for.
jagibbons
50%
50%
jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
4/13/2015 | 1:16:19 PM
Re: What? No Windows ME?
I'll agree that it didn't push the monumental shift that Microsoft had hoped. For those who take a little bit of time to get used to the altered "start menu" or just decide not to let it bother them, the workings of the OS are an improvement over Windows 7. If you have a touchscreen, so much the better.
rjones2818
50%
50%
rjones2818,
User Rank: Strategist
4/13/2015 | 1:05:31 PM
Re: What? No Windows ME?
Windows 8 was a commercial failure. It didn't move people off of XP like it was supposed to and it didn't force companies to upgrade their computer hardware.  Part of this is that Microsoft welded touch on top of it in an attempt to compete with IOS and Android.  That's pretty much failed so far.  It's not a bad operating system once you get past the tiles, but it has been perceived as a failure, much the way Vista was.
Kelly22
50%
50%
Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
4/13/2015 | 10:37:17 AM
Re: 40 years of leassons learned
@mejiac thanks! For a company that has grown as much as Microsoft has, 40 years is plenty of time for hits and misses. I think (/hope) that Windows 10 will be a good follow-up to Windows 8, just as Windows 7 addressed the issues in Vista. To your point, Win8 was Microsoft giving its customers what it thought they wanted - and, given the overwhelmingly negative reaction, they were wrong. It sounds like Microsoft has learned, though, and it's actively trying to listen. I'm also running the preview and think it looks great so far.
Kelly22
50%
50%
Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
4/13/2015 | 10:25:36 AM
Re: What? No Windows ME?
At first I was undecided on whether to call Windows 8 a huge miss for Microsoft. I have a Surface running it now and while it's not great, it's functional. I prefer to use it as a touchscreen because I think the OS was designed for that. But ultimately Win8 went on the list because Microsoft missed the mark for its target audience with its design. Most users running Windows in business or for productivity aren't using the OS on a touchscreen; they're running it on a desktop or laptop. The GUI just doesn't lend itself to that kind of use.
JohnW585
50%
50%
JohnW585,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/12/2015 | 5:10:43 PM
LOL
Of course: Clippy is a minus, XP is a plus...
tjgkg
50%
50%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
4/11/2015 | 3:15:52 PM
Re: What? No Windows ME?
I don't think ME was meant as a serious next edition. It was the last of the Win 3.x operating systems and was essentially a stop gap before XP was released to take over. Remember there was 95 "for consumers" and NT "for enterprises" at the time. XP brought them together.
tjgkg
100%
0%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
4/11/2015 | 3:11:42 PM
Re: Tough Critic
I agree with you about Win 3.1. It's what stabilized Windows and allowed it to start dominating the market. But to say that Word and Excel knocked WordPerfect and Lotus off their perches is misleading. Because they were bundled together and MS became a monopoly is the reason they lost out, not because they were superior products. In fact I don't even think MS developed either one of them, they were acquisitions.
tjgkg
50%
50%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
4/11/2015 | 1:08:27 PM
Re: DOS was bought
One could also say Win 95 was Apple 90 (or something like that). The Office suite was a collection of applications that were acquired. The components were good, but not the best. Word was not WordPerfect, Excel was not Lotus, etc. But Gates wound up cornering the market and his products prevailed.
<<   <   Page 2 / 4   >   >>


State of the Cloud
State of the Cloud
Cloud has drastically changed how IT organizations consume and deploy services in the digital age. This research report will delve into public, private and hybrid cloud adoption trends, with a special focus on infrastructure as a service and its role in the enterprise. Find out the challenges organizations are experiencing, and the technologies and strategies they are using to manage and mitigate those challenges today.
News
COVID-19: Using Data to Map Infections, Hospital Beds, and More
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  3/25/2020
Commentary
Enterprise Guide to Robotic Process Automation
Cathleen Gagne, Managing Editor, InformationWeek,  3/23/2020
Slideshows
How Startup Innovation Can Help Enterprises Face COVID-19
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  3/24/2020
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT Careers: Tech Drives Constant Change
Advances in information technology and management concepts mean that IT professionals must update their skill sets, even their career goals on an almost yearly basis. In this IT Trend Report, experts share advice on how IT pros can keep up with this every-changing job market. Read it today!
White Papers
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Sponsored Video
Flash Poll