BlackBerry Priv Will Be Company's First Android Smartphone - InformationWeek

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BlackBerry Priv Will Be Company's First Android Smartphone
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Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
10/12/2015 | 6:07:28 AM
Re: Changing directions
"One is traction or market share. If the market is dominated by good options, it is very  hard to break in with a new option. It has to be vastly superior to the "good" choices already available and in people's hands."

Jagibbons, these options are with vendors and not with the end users.  Intel is doing the same; now they are offering Atom chip set to certain vendors like Asus, Acer etc at a highly subsidized rate to capture market.  End users have no choice in selecting either the chipset or OS in direct way. They are forcing to select from different offerings from vendors.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
10/12/2015 | 6:03:39 AM
Re: Changing directions
"Those are huge market factors to overcome to break out a new product. It is possible, but not likely. It is also very expensive and relies a lot of other parties, like developers, over whom Blackberry has limited influence."

Jagibbons, you are right, it may be difficult. But the way Android captured market from iOS and Symbian can be possible with other open source OS also.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
10/12/2015 | 5:59:44 AM
Re: Changing directions
"I haven't read much about Bada, but I know Samsung's first attempt at their own OS, Tizen, was a collosial failure. In my experience, it doesn't even work all that well on the smart TVs that run it."

Jagibbons, like Tizen, Bada is also developed by Samsung for Smartphones. But like Tizen, its also a failure. I heard that they are trying something with ubuntu too.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
10/8/2015 | 7:56:33 AM
Re: Changing directions
why they got failed?

Gigi3, there are multiple factors. One is traction or market share. If the market is dominated by good options, it is very  hard to break in with a new option. It has to be vastly superior to the "good" choices already available and in people's hands.

Another factor is the ecosystem. Quite simply, there are a huge number of apps for both Apple and Android platforms. If you come to the market with another OS that requires it's own apps, you need apps. Which means that you need developers to adopt your system and build the apps.

A third key factor comes down to basic marketing and advertising. Entrenched brands have an edge. In the USA, for example, a large part of the population refer to all bandages as "Band-Aids," which is a name brand. The same applies to Kleenex and even Coke to refer to any carbonated drink with a carmelized color.

Those are huge market factors to overcome to break out a new product. It is possible, but not likely. It is also very expensive and relies a lot of other parties, like developers, over whom Blackberry has limited influence.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
10/8/2015 | 7:51:48 AM
Re: Changing directions
I haven't read much about Bada, but I know Samsung's first attempt at their own OS, Tizen, was a collosial failure. In my experience, it doesn't even work all that well on the smart TVs that run it.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
10/8/2015 | 2:15:26 AM
Re: Changing directions
"Markets are is a big driver. In the past five or so years, several other mobile operating systems have tried to break in, and they all failed."

Jagibbons, have you ever analyzed; why they got failed? One among them is Android One, which is promoting by Android/Google consortium itself.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
10/8/2015 | 2:05:46 AM
Re: Changing directions
"I don't think the BlackBerry OS can recover in the market that is completely dominated by Android and iOS. Tackling the security on the management side fills a gap for enterprises. That has always been Blackberry's strenth, and I believe they'd do well to focus all their efforts in that direction. MDM solutions vary widely. A focused effort could put BlackBerry in the driver's seat of that market."

Jagibbons, to an extend you are right about various OS and their market interventions. The same thing happen for Android One too, which is supported by Google and associates. So, I believe that if anyone is capable to deliver something superior than Android, they can sustain in market. Samsung is doing such trials with Bada and other native OS.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2015 | 7:15:00 AM
Re: Changing directions
Markets are is a big driver. In the past five or so years, several other mobile operating systems have tried to break in, and they all failed. While Windows is still around on some phones, they aren't selling well. The others have done far worse or were shelved before they even hit stores. I don't think the BlackBerry OS can recover in the market that is completely dominated by Android and iOS. Tackling the security on the management side fills a gap for enterprises. That has always been Blackberry's strenth, and I believe they'd do well to focus all their efforts in that direction. MDM solutions vary widely. A focused effort could put BlackBerry in the driver's seat of that market.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2015 | 3:32:19 AM
Re: Changing directions
"I feel Blackberry is "testing the waters" if this device brings in good sales they will go for Android devices going forward. At times I feel blackberry should not change their OS, they just have to think differently."

Shakeeb, I have the same thought. They have to try with their native OS and best in class BB security features; where Android is lagging.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2015 | 3:29:39 AM
Re: Changing directions
"I don't think BlackBerry can make a viable stand using their own OS. Taking their previously best-in-class security and management to Android is probably their best move."

Jagibbons, any particular reason? Is it because of their current market share; I believe they can 
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