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Top Programming Languages That Will Future-Proof Your Portfolio
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HelloImLevy
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HelloImLevy,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/8/2016 | 9:27:31 AM
Re: Top Languages need orchestration
Are you being serious? You need platforms and frameworks to create great apps? Since when?
Let me tell you something, there are lots of cases when you do not need a framework to achive a goal. A framework is just a tool to make life a bit easier. 

Second you need to know the language before you use a framework.

And just one thing, let's say you "lear a framework" you get hired by a company because you are familiar with a framework. After 4 years they will wave you goodbye because there is a nother framework hype, you are not familiar with it and the company will hire another person.

You need to know your language....


tfli
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tfli,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/15/2016 | 12:29:24 PM
Top Languages need orchestration

Programming Languages are great but what is really needed is a platform(s) and/or framework to create great apps.  The platform should use languages mentioned here like Javascript (and HTML, the markup language that just missed the list).  In fact scripting languages in general can be faster and easier to use than some of the heavyweight tech languages like C, C++, and Java.  I notice Swift mentioned too but that may be limiting (Apple-centric) at this point.  So, the key is to easily orchestrate an app using a platform that will create and run the app across all commercially dominant operating systems (Windows, Linux, OSX, iOS, Android, etc.).  Not only does the platform need client side scripting (Javascript for example) but easy server side integration too!  It would be nice to see a platform like MANTIS evaluated with its orchestration of included scripting languages and standards usage, tied to robust proven server side processing.

dried_squid
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dried_squid,
User Rank: Moderator
3/14/2016 | 3:12:33 PM
Languages and Frameworks
     I wonder if languages matter that much in object-oriented frameworks.

     Seems like once your classes are carved in stone, it doesn't matter what language did the carving. And then there's the Microsoft Common Language Infrastructure concept. Is it a strategy or a tactic? And C# and F# in the Visual Studio Community Edition, ie. no charge. Definitely a tactic.

    Where I work, in the midst of a transition to a "common off the shelf", COTS, implementation, I was told it was no use to take non-credit courses in HTML, CSS, or JavaScript.

    So maybe for some who don't develop frameworks or classes, learning a language may not be that important, unless you have a personal need.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
3/14/2016 | 2:43:29 PM
Re: Script & Interpreters
Curtis, I just don't know how you would replace the implied security of a compiled program. That raises the bar so much because you have to have so much inside info, plus usually an elevated security level to even place a compiled program on a server. When you can just feed source code in from client and force it to run, how would you protect from that?

Just think of the simple barrier a mainframe and i5 library list place on hacker. You can look at the client code and see the program being called, along with parameters you are feeding it. But that is all you can manipulate. You don't know what program is doing or where it lives.

When you combine that with some decent session control (block CGI spoofing), none of the popular hacks are going to work. No SQL injection, no XSS, no buffer overflow and inject your own code. If edits are poorly done, you could implement a kind of DoS hack by forcing HTTP jobs to crash. But you aren't going to be stealing data.

PHP guys will tell you, and it is probably true, that a server locked down properly for PHP use is secure. The problem is very few people know how to do that. If at server side you use compiled objects, it's near impossible to screw security up.

If I'm not looking at this right, please correct me. I use an IBM i5 (formally AS400). No common hacks will work if using stored procedures or compiled RPG/COBOL at backend. To use PHP, which a lot of i5 people do, you have to essentially run UNIX shell on top of i5 o/s to use PHP, which kills the native security model. So now you better understand both UNIX and i5 security. How many programmers are that good, especially at small companies?
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2016 | 2:26:07 PM
Re: Script & Interpreters
TerryB, the problem with so many scripting languages is that they were never really intended for applications where security (or, in many cases, the outside world) were considerations.

It would be nice to have a simple, powerful, scipting language that just happens to be intrinsicially secure. I'm just not sure what it would be. And the real problem is that IT executives are always going to want fast, low-cost solutions for development, and nothing really beats a scripting language for fast and cheap.
TerryB
IW Pick
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
3/14/2016 | 12:56:28 PM
Script & Interpreters
The fact things like Python and PHP, and to lesser degree, Perl are showing up go a long way to explain why many web apps are as secure as a 1940 outhouse.

"Advanced web application" should make oxymoron list, right next to "Military Intelligience".

As Charlie was hinting, javascript really needs to be expanded into things like Node.js, JQuery, Linear and Extjs and the rest of fullblown javascript libraries. By almost any measure, those are becoming just like a high level programming language for the client side. The best thing about them is they allow many different approaches to server side, allowing you to avoid scripting if you want.

But so, so many take the easy way out on putting up apps. What's the cheapest hardware and cheapest, easiest programming they can do, that's their choice. And sadly, we seem to be learning nothing, it continues. My favorite analogy is The Three Little Pigs. He built a fine house from straw...until the Big Bad Wolf came along. But the brick house? Took a little longer, cost more, but still going strong after the Wolf came by.
Curt Franklin
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Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2016 | 12:50:10 PM
Re: Expectation setback: No Go, No Node.js
Charlie, I was surprised by the lack of Go. There are several possible explanations (aside from the obvious), including that companies using Go aren't using external testing. The lack of interest in hiring language could mean that companies are using existing in-house talent for their dev teams, but either way I agree: You'd think that companies would be both using the languages now and hiring for the future.

The question is whether there's a lot of latent demand or whether there's less uptake than we think.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2016 | 12:13:11 PM
Expectation setback: No Go, No Node.js
In terms of future-proofing the enterprise, I expected to see Google's Go listed, since it's the language of container orchestration and management, as found in Kubernetes. I also expected to see Node.js in higher demand than JavaScript, but it could be client-side programming still dominates server-side.


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