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Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
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moarsauce123
50%
50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/6/2012 | 3:32:43 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
You're missing the point. A lot of users (even in SMBs) are using tablets and mobile form factors outside of the workplace.

There's a productivity gap when they come into the workplace and have to switch operating systems to work with 'in house' software versus 'mobile' software.

Windows 8 bridges that gap. Same device at home as at work. Same software. Same cloud back end. Same identity system.

Then there's the devices - the PC industry is about to go an a huge journey where devices go from laptop form factor to a more flexible form factor where touch, mouse, keyboard and pen all come into play - once users see this, they won't want to go back to the devices that they had before.

The idea that anyone would spend more than about 30 minutes 'learning to use' Windows 8 is not realistic. The old UI is largely as it was. The new UI is simple. A child can figure it out in no time at all.

Then the idea that 'Windows 7 is good enough' is an interesting one. Why not have a PC that boots faster? That makes better use of battery life? That has more file system options? That has easier backup options? That has new virtualisation and multi-monitor options? i.e. Why not have a better Windows 7 == Windows 8.

You say that the two things that you do most often are 'typing and talking on the phone'. Which operating system is going to be *key* for Microsoft to target with their new versions of Word, Lync and Skype? That's going to be Windows 8.

It's also interesting to hear people in the comments say that the desktop in Windows 8 is 'poor' compared to Windows 7. What's poor about it? One thing has been removed - the Start Menu which most power users don't use anyway. Everything else is improvement or neutral. So, where does 'poor' come from?
Timesaver
50%
50%
Timesaver,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/6/2012 | 2:25:38 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
"the best tool for the job" - "You can easily configure it to behave 'exactly' like Windows 7" - The "best tool" for most Business customers at the moment is not an OS which takes away the start menu (for good without the use of a 3rd party simulation app) and leaves users high and dry without a feature they have been using in one form or another since 1995! And how do you "ignore the UI"? These comments sound like someone who has read articles about Windows 8, but has never had much hands on experience with the OS.
Faye Kane, homeless brain
50%
50%
Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
10/6/2012 | 1:09:26 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
==--
> If you have no use for better dual monitor support,

...Thank you, MS Marketing department employee, but I have dual monitors and they work great, but thank you anyway.

> touch screens

Buy a $100 O/S and a new $300 monitor so I can raise my arm to the screen every time I want to click a button?

HAHAAH! I don't THINK so!

> follow-me data and system settings

I'll keep my config settings on my laptop, thank you.

> or expanding storage with a few clicks,

You mean "let Microsoft hold my data for me instead of keeping it on my hard drive where it belongs". Why would I want to load my documents over a slow 10 MB/s internet connection instead of my 6 GB/s hard drive, when 2TB drives are now under $100?

And why should I hand over all my data to Microsoft so they can charge my ATM card every month and hold my critical documents for ransom if I don't pay tribute to Ballmer?

Is it as a backup to my local storage? I have two drives, and a batch file copies all the changed stuff onto the backup every night.

Why would a small business want to let Microsoft be a slow, expensive substitute for a hard drive? Why is that even a suggestion anyone takes seriously?

> built-in access to a vetted software library

You mean run Office from a MS server so they can charge me for that too every month. This is better for my business?

Why should I run office at all, when the open source version does the same things better (no "ribbon") and is free? In a small business, cost matters.

And I DON'T want MS to have its hand in my business (not to mention my pocket)! Why would I expose myself to their system outages, security flaws, and hacker attacks for no reason whatsoever? And PAY for all this, when it's completely unnecessary?

You say 8 can be made to look like 7? I already have an O/S that looks like Win7.

> then stick with Windows 7

OKAY!

I'm sure a lot of people will take you up on that suggestion too!

Your employer, Microsoft, knows dam well that 8 is unusable. They're trying to force us to buy a tablet OS which is grotesque on a desktop, figuring that people will then buy their Metro tablets and telephones.

GIt's not for us users, it's for Microsoft.

That's so obvious that I feel embarrassed saying so. I feel like the kid who pointed out that the Emperor is naked, and the adults continue to pretend to take him seriously.

Win 8 is the best example of Microsoft arrogance yet, and the predictable disaster will finally be enough for even Gates to acknowledge that Ballmer has run their company into the ground.

8 will go down in business school history as "Ballmer's last mistake".

--faye
Faye Kane, homeless brain
50%
50%
Faye Kane, homeless brain,
User Rank: Strategist
10/6/2012 | 12:52:31 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
==--
> If you have no use for better dual monitor support,

...Thank you, MS Marketing department employee, but I have dual monitors and they work great, but thank you anyway.

> touch screens

Buy a $100 O/S and a new $300 monitor so I can raise my arm to the screen every time I want to click a button?

HAHAAH! I don't THINK so!

> follow-me data and system settings

I'll keep my config settings on my laptop, thank you.

> or expanding storage with a few clicks,

You mean "let Microsoft hold my data for me instead of keeping it on my hard drive where it belongs". Why would I want to load my documents over-a slow 10 MB/s internet connection instead of my 6 GB/s hard drive, when 2TB drives are now under $100?

And why should I hand over all my data to Microsoft so they can charge my ATM card every month and hold my critical documents for ransom if I don't pay tribute to Ballmer?

Is it as a backup to my local storage? I have two drives, and a batch file copies all the changed stuff onto the backup every night.

Why would a small business want to let Microsoft be a slow, expensive substitute for a hard drive? Why is that even a suggestion anyone takes seriously?

> built-in access to a vetted software library

You mean run Office from a MS server so they can charge me for that too every month. This is better for my business?

Why should I run office at all, when the open source version does the same things better (no "ribbon") and is free? In a small business, cost matters.

And I DON'T want MS to have its hand in my business (not to mention my pocket)! Why would I expose myself to their system outages, security flaws, and hacker attacks for no reason whatsoever? And PAY for all this, when it's completely unnecessary?

You say 8 can be made to look like 7? I already have an O/S that looks like Win7.

> then stick with Windows 7

OKAY!

I'm sure a lot of people will take you up on that suggestion too!

Your employer, Microsoft, knows dam well that 8 is unusable. They're trying to force us to buy a tablet OS which is grotesque on a desktop, figuring that people will then buy their Metro tablets and telephones.

GIt's not for us users, it's for Microsoft.

That's so obvious that I feel embarrassed saying so. I feel like the kid who pointed out that the Emperor is naked, and the adults continue to pretend to take him seriously.

Win 8 is the best example of Microsoft arrogance yet, and the predictable disaster will finally be enough for even Gates to acknowledge that Ballmer has run their company into the ground.

8 will go down in business school history as "Ballmer's last mistake".

--faye
FMANFREDI327
50%
50%
FMANFREDI327,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 8:54:29 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
I agree, I was working as computer operations manager in an IBM mainframe environment back in the 1980's. They had just come out with an OS release and I asked my manager if we would do the upgrade right away. He said no, he would wait until the updated, bug free release, because pioneers get arrows in their A__!. I found that to be good advice in my career, if the existing technology is working, I will stay with it, until there is a good reason to upgrade.
moonwatcher
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50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2012 | 7:50:34 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
OK, if I already had Win 7, then yeah, I'd make the same choice. But for many of us hold outs still stuck on XP, upgrading for $40 makes sense, especially to get latest versions of software (for instance Solidworks 2013 will not run on XP, but will run on Win 8) - since Win 8 under the hood is really the same (from the application's standpoint) as Win 7. If upgrading from XP to Win 8 allows me to get a couple more years use out of my desktop PC, (and doesn't break anything), then it is a good deal.
reversehalo
50%
50%
reversehalo,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 7:10:37 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Millions will heartily disagree with you. The primary reason: Approximately 40 to 50% of the marketplace still use Windows XP. Their computers are on average 8 years old or greater. It's time to upgrade. I fully expect Windows 8 to surpass sales of Windows 95. Millions will gladly upgrade. The second reason, there are significant technological improvements found in Windows 8 - something that nearly every article that I read seems to completely overlook. Technological improvements in Windows 8 (not in Windows 7) include UEFI, ReFs, File History, etc. Increased data integrity. Increased malware protection. Also, the upgrade process will be low in cost. On average, $15. Other related items being released at the same time - Windows App Store, Windows Phone 8, brick and mortar Windows Stores throughout the United States, Windows Surface Tablets, Office 2013, etc., etc., etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...
sonicmetalman
50%
50%
sonicmetalman,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 6:18:23 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
What I liked about the Windows 8 Enterprise Eval - it performed better on older hardware than Windows 7 did. Unfortunately that was it. Honestly I cannot see the Enterprise version really working in an office environment without using the available 3rd party menu tweaks.

Lack of sales could force MS to alter the Enterprise version back to the standard desktop model. I would bet that contingency has already been discussed in Redmond and could be easily implemented. This is assuming of course that Ballmer finds a way to spin this as anything other than the debacle we know it will be.

MS may have inadvertently created a divergent path for Enterprise computing to explore Linux desktops. Certainly Apple can reap benefits from this fork in the road.
gfish66
50%
50%
gfish66,
User Rank: Strategist
10/5/2012 | 6:14:12 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Kevin, I couldn't agree more, and I've been a Microsoftie since the 1980s.
Leo Regulus
50%
50%
Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/5/2012 | 5:45:39 PM
re: Windows 8: Why I Won't Upgrade
Concur with Author, Mike & Terry's comments. (IMHO) XP is still a viable work horse for most people, especially SMBs. The same can be said about Office 2003. Also, show me a viable ROI for both SMBs & Enterprise G and letGs not be using todaysG political Gfuzzy mathG.
Touch Screen? I worked with a corporation that put Touch Screens on Win 95 POS units before Win 98 hit the streets. Anyone associated with that product will tell you that it was G and still is G an extremely viable commercial product in that environment. The point here is: Where the heck has MS been for about 15 years?
Yes, I have Win 8 loaded in a VM. It fails to attract me. I also have several flavors of Linux loaded in multiple-boot configurations on several other units. I enjoy using them significantly more than Win 8. Much less frustration and a lot more convenience & ease of use.
But, everyone to their own opinion. Your mileage may differ.
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