What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say - InformationWeek

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What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
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Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 6:06:42 PM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
I'm not going to comment on your dissertation but to be clear I NEVER said I encouraged anyone to upgrade. In fact the ONLY upgrade I've done is for my daughter's Dell. Almost without fail my customers stay on the OS they bought until the system is ready to be retired, but for new machines they buy 8.

And 8's GUI was absolutely designed to be both a desktop AND a mobile GUI and if you'd read Charlie Babcock's comments he said Win8 would lag behind Apple and Google's GUIs without ANY logic behind it.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
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5/9/2013 | 6:06:26 PM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
What's wrong with a single OS that supports both desktop and touch? Why have two (like Apple) that are completely different both in UX and app ecosystems?
Win8 and WinPhone8 are the same core OS. Yes, there are still some minor limitations in running the same app on both but they are not huge issues to deal with from a developer perspective. Inf fact, from a developer standpoint, it is much easier to write apps for Win8 versions than for Apple. The ability to code one app and run on either Win8 OS is imminent.
ARM is a completely different chipset and thus requires it's own flavor of Win8. Support for the ARM chip was a hedge against Intel not getting low power high performance chips developed in time to address the need. If I were running MS, I would have made the same bet with ARM/RT.
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 6:02:38 PM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
I've yet to find any mainstream hardware that doesn't work with Win8 if it worked with Win7 and what stuff can't you find easily?
Terabyte Net
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Terabyte Net,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 6:01:46 PM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
I'm not saying Metro is perfect for everyone, but then again one can use Notepad to write memos and business proposals in too but they don't, they install an application to get done what the want better. Should Microsoft include Word with Windows? Come on, skipping a great OS with many other features because you won't install a FREE app is cutting your nose off to spite your face.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 5:55:59 PM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
My God man! That was the most long winded, yet vacuous, post I have ever read. You seem to think that everyone is being "forced" to upgrade everything to Win8. Hey, if you don't like Win8, or have a need for it, then simply "choose" something else. Or, stay with what you already have. You do have a choice.
Win8 is a platform that addresses the need to be competitive in the new touch centric highly mobile world we are now living in. And, it lets you enjoy the best of both worlds. Traditional desktop computing plus the growing reliance on touch based mobile devices. Switch from one UI to the other depending on your need. Keep legacy app support while also indulging in the new app ecosystem.
I don't see a problem with that so let's just move on.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 5:39:33 PM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
What? You must be a slow learner then if you are a year out and still can't find things. There is this thing called "Search" that will help you. Just start typing.
Also, you do realize that you can arrange and re-arrange the Modern Start screen to any configuration you like. Right? The same way you can arrange the old desktop. That's the point of it... both UI's are completely customizable.
BogusFred
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BogusFred,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2013 | 4:30:36 PM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
"Add Classic Shell to it and there's no reason not to go to it over Win7."

And why do you need to add Classic Shell? Maybe because it's something Microsoft should have done in the first place? The "Modern" UI's start screen adds nothing useful for keyboard and mouse users of systems with large non-touch screens like myself. It's also half-baked: Why does the "Settings" tool available from the Start Screen not include the settings available through the control panel?
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2013 | 11:48:42 AM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
As in the past, Microsoft counts licenses sold as all those licenses that were shipped. That includes the entire blocks of licenses OEMs and businesses have bought. That is not the same as systems in active use or market share. That is the difference the spin doctors intentionally ignore.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2013 | 11:45:59 AM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
I disagree. You apparently have not spent any time on the forums during the public beta of Win8. Users of all levels complained about Win8 and mainly about four things:
- boots into Metro that offers zero value on non-touch systems (aka desktops)
- no Start button
- no Start menu
- reorganizing and relabeling of many things for no apparent benefit

All these four issues are core to Windows as they are constantly hit when interacting with the system. The most common and most fundamental tasks were made incredibly more difficult to use for the desktop user.
On a tablet this might be a different story, big bulky tiles are easier to tap with fingers and the usage patterns on tablets are different as they are mainly used for content consumption. The tablet based content creation is likely limited to dropping a one line comment, tweets, or the like with little data entry.
Win8's biggest flaw is the forced convergence of tablet and desktop OS. Big tiles that are predominantly static are just a waste of screen space for a desktop user, especially when working with traditional software. Have you ever installed MSSQL on Win8? It plasters 30 static tiles on Metro totally ignoring any organization by task groups that you'd get with a start menu. Metro is nothing more than the start menu without folders and structure, a really dumb implementation.
Now, I could see the reason behind that if there is just one Win8 version, but there is Win8 for desktop, Win8RT for ARM, and Windows Phone 8. They each have aside from some visual similarities nothing in common. There is no way to run the same app on all three OS without compiling and packaging a special version for each. Even Apple got that more right having one desktop centric OS and one mobile OS. The entire design approach to Win8 is fatally flawed and spits on the works of those who researched human to machine interaction and UX for the past decades, including work Microsoft has done.
How hard is it to accept that the low adoption rate of Win8 is most likely because it is a really bad product?
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2013 | 11:33:00 AM
re: What Microsoft Windows 8 License Numbers Don't Say
There is more than a 10 minute learning curve. I use Win8 unfortunately on a daily basis and even after a year still have difficulties to find stuff. It is either buried six feet under somewhere or all cluttered on the Metro UI without any means of organizing it hierarchically. Plus, a lot of hardware that works fine out of the gate on W7 is unknown to Win8.
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