IoT
Comments
Windows XP Security Issues: Fact Vs. Fiction
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 4   >   >>
LADave
50%
50%
LADave,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2015 | 1:15:13 PM
Can't run anything beyond XP. Really now?
Regardless of operating system, the current practical rock-bottom minimum probably is Pentium 4 and 2GB.  Earlier CPUs lack SSE2 instructions increasingly required by high-priority applications (Skype for one), making older setups unacceptably constraining for primary use.  Few P4 motherboards won't accept at least 2GB. By that point you're ready for Windows 7 or a reasonably up-to-date Linux. 

The hardware expense is trivial because business-oriented Dell, HP and Lenovo P4 systems are being cycled out of corporations by truckloads and oversaturate the market.  For a few dollars more you can even find Core Duos that will run in 64 bit mode as well as 32 bit with a considerable speed boost over P4.
boardhead
0%
100%
boardhead,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/7/2014 | 6:43:56 PM
Cloud printing
Michael,

I've replaced my XP pc with a Chromebook for internet use.  However I don't have a cloud based printer and can't print directly from Chromebook so my pc must be on and connected to the printer.  Am I at risk if the pc is connected to wifi to recieve print but not connected to the internet?
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2014 | 4:16:50 PM
Re: on the menu at Milwaukee Vietnamese restaurant ...
Thanks for sharing the story. I'm sure others are in the same boat. Personally, I've run into several people who were running XP and unaware of the impending support termination deadline.
IMjustinkern
IW Pick
100%
0%
IMjustinkern,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2014 | 4:02:28 PM
on the menu at Milwaukee Vietnamese restaurant ...
... the restaurant I went to this weekend was running their reservations & sales on XP. I asked the bartender/owner they he anything about the end of life. He didn't, laughed said "we're probably too busy to care." After, he said he'd have his IT guy look at it. Just an anecdote, but certainly worth remembering that not everyone has expiring tech anywhere close to the top of their concerns. 

P.S. And no, just because it was a Vietnamese restaurant in Milwaukee doesn't mean brats were on the menu. The High Life and donuts, however, were delicious with the pho. 
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2014 | 3:35:58 PM
Re: Probably not as serious as is made out.
I don't doubt that someone who knows what she/he is doing can safely lock down an aging machine. But isn't there some presumption here that user patterns will never change? Some people don't want to upgrade because their current computer meets their current needs. As long as those needs don't change and precautions are taken, perhaps these people can get away without upgrading. But "needs," including the need to be protected while computing, involve a lot of gray areas, especially as more and more essential activities move to the browser. Tech savvy Windows XP holdouts might recognize that seemingly slight changes in behavior present larger changes in malware risks. But tech savvy people aren't the only ones using computers. Some people who say "Windows XP is good enough for me" undeniably have a valid point. But I'm not so sure about others.
Michael Endler
0%
100%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2014 | 3:26:33 PM
Re: Linux could be a great option
Thanks for the Linux resources, but I don't think I can agree that Windows 8.1 imposes a "near vertical learning curve," especially if the alternative is jumping from XP to Linux. Windows 8.1 can be baffling to a first-time user, but I think 15 minutes of guided training is probably enough for most people to get the general idea, and to learn how to tweak settings to their preferences. That's not to say that Windows 8.1 doesn't include some silly/stubborn UI elements-- it does. But while the "learning curve" talking point isn't irrelevant, I think it's become a bit mythologized. Whether people like using the OS is a different (albeit related) factor than whether people can learn how it works. For at least some IW commenters, the former issue seems to be as big or bigger than the latter.
CraigHerberg
100%
0%
CraigHerberg,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2014 | 2:14:06 PM
Re: Healthcare scare?
Y2K was a little more complicated than checking PCs BIOS to see if they would behave on and after January 1, 2000.  There were millions of programs, many of which were used to run hospitals, universities, banks, airplanes, etc., coded as if [19]99 were the end of time.  Using a two-digit year made good sense in the 1970s, when storage was expensive and the year 2000 was a quarter century away, but it became very tedius and expensive to fix before the turn of the century.  Even worse, the practice of using a two-digit year continued well into the 1990s.
robzilla
IW Pick
100%
0%
robzilla,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2014 | 5:53:50 PM
14 years of support not enough?
I do not understand how people could not have taken action to switch operating systems? If you only use xp for email and browsing then a couple hundred dollars will get you a laptop or tablet that will run so much better. To complain about support ending is unbelievable in my opinion. What other OS has ever been supported for so long. Just bite the bullet and switch. Also Windows 8 is not nearly as bad as all the people are complaining about. Windows 7 is a great desktop OS but it is a resource hog and slow to boot up compared to win 8. I am not a windows lover either but I give credit where it is due and Windows 8 is really awesome on the right device. If you really can't get a new tablet or pc then Linux is the best alternative you have. It just won't run too well on 512mb of ram. Modern Linux had evolved and it needs modern hardware. I really so no option for people other than getting a new device unless it is some business setting and using special software and even then there should be some alternative.
ShadyBuffalo64
100%
0%
ShadyBuffalo64,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2014 | 12:04:47 PM
Re: The issue is no one trusts Microsoft
There are couple of options - The best is a new PC running Windows 7 - There are plenty around HP is actively selling new machines with Windows 7. (https://shopping.hp.com/desktops%20&%20all-in-ones/windows+7)

If it's out of your budget, you can consider going to Linux, take a look at this - http://www.pcworld.com/article/2107641/3-easy-linux-alternatives-for-windows-xp-refugees-who-dont-want-a-new-pc.html

Staying on XP will be like driving without a seatbelt, it's only a matter of time before something BAD is going to happen.
ShadyBuffalo64
0%
100%
ShadyBuffalo64,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2014 | 11:57:38 AM
Linux could be a great option
For many, the cost of a new PC and near vertical learning curve of Windows 8 is a major issue. However I have tried a number Linux distros and I have to say that they are definitely a good option. THe setup process is a bit challenging and you need to know that Windows applications wont run, but there are numerous replacements that are just as good and often better. For most, Libre Office and Linux versions of software will do just fine.

Here are some alternatives :

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2107641/3-easy-linux-alternatives-for-windows-xp-refugees-who-dont-want-a-new-pc.html


My personal favorie distro is Mint Linux because it's the closest to the Windows style UI.

http://www.linuxmint.com/
Page 1 / 4   >   >>


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
2016 InformationWeek Elite 100
Our 28th annual ranking of the leading US users of business technology.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of April 24, 2016. We'll be talking with the InformationWeek.com editors and correspondents who brought you the top stories of the week!
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.