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Entrust Debuts E-Mail-Monitoring Tool

Concerned about spam? Maybe you should be worried about the E-mail your own employees are sending.

Thomas Claburn

October 1, 2004

1 Min Read

The surge in spam and viruses makes it easy to forget that internal communications can prove as problematic as external messages. Entrust Inc., an identity- and access-management software company, revealed Thursday the availability of a Linux-based appliance to address E-mail content concerns, whether incoming, outgoing, or internal. The Entrust Entelligence Compliance Server brings E-mail into real-time regulatory and policy compliance, allowing administrators to deal with offensive language, spam, or the requirements of laws such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

"Clearly, there are threats from the outside, and people are annoyed by the amount of spam coming into the organization," says Leah MacMillan, VP of secure messaging at Entrust. "But there's also a great concern about the kind of information that's actually leaving an organization."

Some of the ways companies check E-mail for compliance, such as hiring people to review outbound E-mail, occur only after a violation has happened, she says. "We can capture E-mail as it leaves the organization and before a violation occurs, so you can take the appropriate action," she says.

That might include sending E-mail back for consideration or quarantining it until a privacy officer has reviewed it. Or it might mean automatically encrypting the message if the Compliance Server deems its contents sensitive.

"For example, if you're in the health-care industry and you're handling private health information," MacMillan says, "if you're accepting those messages, you also have to be concerned with the compliance issues associated with that."

About the Author(s)

Thomas Claburn

Editor at Large, Enterprise Mobility

Thomas Claburn has been writing about business and technology since 1996, for publications such as New Architect, PC Computing, InformationWeek, Salon, Wired, and Ziff Davis Smart Business. Before that, he worked in film and television, having earned a not particularly useful master's degree in film production. He wrote the original treatment for 3DO's Killing Time, a short story that appeared in On Spec, and the screenplay for an independent film called The Hanged Man, which he would later direct. He's the author of a science fiction novel, Reflecting Fires, and a sadly neglected blog, Lot 49. His iPhone game, Blocfall, is available through the iTunes App Store. His wife is a talented jazz singer; he does not sing, which is for the best.

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