Sponsored By

I2's Revenue Falls, But Company Sees New Opportunities

I2 chairman and CEO Sanjiv Sidhu says the global outsourcing of supply chains is creating new opportunities for the company.

Elena Malykhina

February 4, 2005

1 Min Read

I2 Technologies Inc. reported a decrease in revenue in the fourth quarter and for the full year of 2004. Fourth-quarter 2004 revenue was $84 million, compared with $98 million the same quarter a year ago. For the year, revenue was $389 million, down from $495 million in 2003.

But with new customers like U.S. Foodservice, Nissan North America, and China Steel, i2 says it continues to build a strong momentum in the supply-chain market despite its rocky financial history.

There are several new opportunities for i2 in the changing market, chairman and CEO Sanjiv Sidhu says. Global outsourcing of supply chains continues to increase at a rapid pace, which is forcing companies to innovate and bring new products to market faster to meet customer demand.

To address these changing needs, i2 has created a five-pillar strategy, which includes application services, data management, and an integrated development environment. "What we want to bring is an integrated data model and reference workflows so with our solution, customers need not build a data model or a workflow from scratch, and [they] can tailor i2's reference models and workflows to their specific needs," Sidhu says.

The software vendor also is coming up with new customer-support programs. For example, i2 launched the Supply Chain Leaders program last year to help companies create and deploy demand-driven supply-chain software using i2's intellectual property over the course of an agreed-upon contract term.

Says Sidhu, "You'll see that certain customers will move away from buying licensed software and they will move to more holistic solutions."

About the Author(s)

Elena Malykhina

Technology Journalist

Elena Malykhina began her career at The Wall Street Journal, and her writing has appeared in various news media outlets, including Scientific American, Newsday, and the Associated Press. For several years, she was the online editor at Brandweek and later Adweek, where she followed the world of advertising. Having earned the nickname of "gadget girl," she is excited to be writing about technology again for InformationWeek, where she worked in the past as an associate editor covering the mobile and wireless space. She now writes about the federal government and NASA’s space missions on occasion.

Never Miss a Beat: Get a snapshot of the issues affecting the IT industry straight to your inbox.

You May Also Like


More Insights