Why It's Time To Dump Your Old-School Hiring Practices - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // Team Building & Staffing
Commentary
7/18/2016
09:06 AM
Nathan Hughes
Nathan Hughes
Commentary
50%
50%

Why It's Time To Dump Your Old-School Hiring Practices

Detroit Labs needed to find a new way of hiring employees. The agency, which focuses on full-service mobile, wearable, and internet hardware, needed candidates who could demonstrate their abilities to think as well as act. The company's co-founder, Nathan Hughes, tells us how old-school hiring practices were completely rewritten, what the new hiring model looks like, and how your organization can follow suit.

12 Ways To Cultivate A Data-Savvy Workforce
12 Ways To Cultivate A Data-Savvy Workforce
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

When it comes to finding the ideal job candidate to work at our company, expertise in today's specific technology often takes a back seat. Instead, we look to identify candidates who are problem solvers, who can easily adapt, and who can find solutions to next year's challenges.

This kind of approach requires a different, more nuanced attitude than a typical skills-based assessment. To identify the individuals who can change as fast as our business, and who can thrive in our low overhead, decentralized structure, we made several key structural decisions early on. We determined the following:

  • Hiring would be an open and inclusive process. By encouraging full company participation and public conversation about hiring activities, we hoped to counter -- or at least quickly surface -- issues such as cronyism, favoritism, and unconscious bias, which can plague other hiring processes.
  • Hiring activities would be goal-oriented, instead of structured on existing industry standards. We abandoned resumes and adopted custom questionnaires tailored to each role, required practical skills interviews for every position, and distributed interview responsibilities across all teams and all roles.
  • Hiring methodologies would be standardized across all roles, and we would build a record of hiring activities and outcomes that would allow us to use historical data in our hiring decisions.

The best hiring processes combine art and science to produce optimum results. Actively balancing objective methodologies with subjective opinions is an important aspect of the process.

For example, resumes are problematic for us for several reasons. They all look different and contain different content. The impression a well-designed resume may give an interviewer is irrelevant to predicting job success. While it can be influential in the first screen, the content contained in a resume is usually not useful for determining whether a candidate should be brought in for further conversations.

To eliminate resumes from our hiring process, we created a new first step for potential candidate. Each one is asked to complete a role-specific questionnaire, which we call the "Getting to Know You" (GTKY) document.

[How do your hiring plans stack up? Read 10 IT Hiring Plans for Second Half of 2016.]

With a GTKY, we standardized the questions asked of every single candidate for a role, only asking useful and important questions we determined are valuable in assessing candidate suitability. We also worked on developing an understanding of what a good answer to a question looks like.

We are then able to compare candidate applications more uniformly. On the flipside, candidates are able to express themselves uniquely in their answers and communicate their personalities and storytelling abilities in order to shine the best light on themselves and their accomplishments.

When we talk about our hiring process being open and inclusive, we're not merely paying lip service to the idea. In each case, everyone in the company gets one vote, everyone in the company can and should participate in every candidate's hiring process, and no one's vote is more important than any other's vote.

(Image: oneinchpunch/iStockphoto)

(Image: oneinchpunch/iStockphoto)

While this seems straightforward, it isn't an easy rule to follow. We've held fast to this rule in the face of special requests to bring founder acquaintances on board. We've held fast, even when a candidate with a unique and specialized skill had an interview-ruining personality flaw. We stuck to the process, even in cases when project manager candidates earned strong support from other project managers, but were panned by the design team.

This one rule has been instrumental in making it difficult, or even impossible, for empire building. It's also eliminated the temptation to abandon our strict hiring standards in the interest of what might be a short-term gain.

In order to fulfill our goal of complete transparency and inclusion in our interview processes, we've intentionally designed our practices to be transferable across company roles and business units and adaptable to unique hiring situations.

The steps for hiring full-time team members are always the same. The candidate submits the GTKY, the team votes "yes" or "no" on the GTKY, and then the votes are tallied. If the candidate passes muster, he or she is invited to in-person interviews.

This first interview assesses a candidate's potential non-technical contributions to Detroit Labs. The interviewers vote, and if there aren't any hard "no" votes, the candidate is invited to participate in a second interview. This second interview assesses the candidate's practical ability to perform the tasks required in the role.

For developers, this may be programming exercises. For designers, this could be a take-home redesign exercise they bring in to pitch and discuss in front of an audience. At that point, we take a final full-pass review of the candidate and decide whether to offer the person a job.

By keeping the steps of the process the same no matter what role is being interviewed for, team members can drop into and out of the process as they see fit for any candidate. They do not have to exclude themselves from interviews that may fall outside their work experience.

If you want to do a second interview for a quality assurance position, but have never done that before, you know it's a practical review of how that candidate could do the QA job. It gives you context to ask for guidance on helping conduct the interview. It also allows us to develop some common language and expectations around the process when uninvolved team members enter the assessment process.

The process scales and adapts for different kinds of activities.

For example, a few times a year we offer an Apprenticeship Program. This paid position generates hundreds of applications for, at most, a dozen jobs. The interview process steps are the same: GTKY, first interview, second interview. But we modify these for screening and assessment of groups versus individuals.

Instead of a candidate meeting with five Detroit Labs employees for a first interview, we organize 10-minute "speed dating" exercises and hand out interview sheets to our interviewers. This allows us to effectively and rapidly interview 30 or 40 applicants, and generate hundreds of countable and comparable scores, in an hour.

The second interview can scale up and become a night with several code challenges assigned to candidate teams, with candidates switching teams every 30 minutes to tackle a new challenge with a new team.

Interviewing and hiring in this manner is not without its challenges. For one, it's impossible to get your friend, who you know would be great and you'd love to work with, a job in Detroit Labs. Everyone has to earn their spot.

Without a wide and active amount of participation across the full team, this process can breed the same problems it attempts to eliminate, such as a hiring manager only being comfortable with hiring people who are just like him or her.

Introducing interviewing to every member of the company requires a lot of training and compliance conversations, so team members understand what is acceptable and unacceptable in interviews.

But, whether looking for seasoned executives or students most likely to excel in a technical apprenticeship, time after time we've seen a structured, team-based, goal-oriented interview process outperform the traditional resume keywords and HR-exclusive hiring systems.

Is this hiring method something you'd try at your organization? As a job candidate, how would you feel about going through this process, as opposed to the typical resume-driven, HR-led practices?

Have you worked to change the hiring procedures in your organization? Let's talk about it in the comments section below.

Nathan Hughes serves as cofounder of Detroit Labs, a Detroit-based mobile development company and maker of iPhone, iPad, Android, and vehicle apps. The firm has partnered with national brands like Domino's Pizza, General Motors, DTE Energy, and Hyundai to dream up, design, ... View Full Bio
We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
vnewman2
50%
50%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2016 | 6:48:01 AM
Re: Adding to the problem
Let's take it one step further. How would you screen applicants then? Just interview everyone?
vnewman2
50%
50%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2016 | 6:35:34 AM
Re: Adding to the problem
@joe I'm not defending use of the resume. I don't particularly care for them. But if it is going to be used as a screening instrument then for Petes sake - put the time and effort in to get it right. It's not a pop quiz. It's just sheer laziness to turn in a less than perfect one.
jries921
50%
50%
jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
7/21/2016 | 1:34:23 PM
Re: Adding to the problem
So might we be on the verge of making the time-honored performing arts practice of auditioning standard proceedure when evaluating applicants for non-performing jobs?
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/21/2016 | 10:28:07 AM
Re: Adding to the problem
Infographic alternatives to traditional resumes can be cool, but (1) they are typically only respected in a small subset of fields (e.g., certain marketing and design jobs at cerrtain companies), and (2) are completely useless for the vast majority of enterprises that use Taleo, Brassring, and a bazillion other auto-trash services to filter people out.  Anything non-standard is ditched.  Innovative and effective communication in one to two pages takes a backseat to 10-page resumes repeating the same keywords and rewordings of the job description to the point of headache-inducing redundancy (or, rather, headache inducing if they were actually read and filtered by a human -- which they aren't until you reach the point where a human is looking at you -- at which point 90% of non-HR human hiring managers don't care too much about resume nitty gritty).
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/20/2016 | 5:17:43 PM
Re: Adding to the problem
@TerryB: My agreement with your points aside, there is also the issue of the automated resume-screening software -- which automatically throws out resumes that don't conform with the software's extremely specific expectations.

It took me years of unsuccessful job searching before I realized that a big part of the reason I wasn't getting anywhere is that my resume used to feature dates first (which used to be the standard way to write a resume) -- and that most resume-screening software works in such a way that where the date is featured first, it automatically disregards the entire job entry.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Author
7/20/2016 | 5:13:22 PM
Re: Adding to the problem
@vnewman: Any form of written/typed communication can showcase one's tendencies to make typos/mispell words/etc..  If that's the best defense for resumes as a key hiring tool, then it's a pretty poor one.

(I would also argue that the occasional spelling mistake should not completely blow a candidate out of the water.  I have seen one of the most brilliant and talented marketing people I know -- and, I daresay, probably the best in her industry -- make occasional egregious spelling and grammatical errors (albeit moreso in personal communications -- not professional).  If your resume is littered with errors, sure, there are some judgment issues there, but one or two probably shouldn't be an automatic candidacy killer except to the HR recruiter desperate for any reason to throw someone in the circular file.  But this is a separate discussion altogether.)



TerryB
50%
50%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/20/2016 | 1:42:48 PM
Re: Adding to the problem
@vnewman, I think first time I ever disagreed with you in this forum. As contrary as I am, that almost counts as a miracle. :-)

I absolutely hated creating a resume. Especially after your career gets longer. What the heck do you put in and what do you leave out? How do you guess what is important to some HR screener who knows nothing about tech? Well, other than you chose a nice Word template? It's essentially bragging about yourself. And then the reader of resume has to try and determine if real or you made it all up. The fact resume looks great hardly helps with that. 

If a person really produces a resume (in these days of templates and spell checkers) as poorly as your example, it won't take long to weed that out in the first interview. 

But I will admit, not really clear to me from this article what replaces a resume as first point of contact to the company looking to hire. I could see progressive companies having a web based application form tailored for skills they are looking for in a job as the first elimination phase before interviews. Espcecially in tech where "needs 5 years of experience" hardly applies to brand new technologies not 5 years old yet. And Detroit Labs is all about creative people, the hardest to figure out good/bad during a hiring process. 
rjrocker
50%
50%
rjrocker,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/20/2016 | 7:54:07 AM
We're Moving
Hi,

 

From this year onwards we're moving away from the old hiring process for our company MBAFrog. Recently we've hired a consultant for this job and within 3 months of time he will come up with a completely new process. I like the idea of "Getting to Know You" (GTKY). I will communicate this to our consultant. The article is indeed helpful. Thanks for sharing it with us.

 

Regards

RJ
diangelo1973
50%
50%
diangelo1973,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/19/2016 | 4:46:10 PM
Re: Adding to the problem
Such negativity. Wow.

 

I think this is a wonderful way to find people that fit the culture you are striving for in a company. The idea of looking for people who have the atributs you desire even and then trusting that you have the infrastructre in place to bring those talents to a place where employees can thrive is awesome. 

 

I think their entire interview process sounds refreshing. Its a great way to find people that could excel in a job they never held. 

 

It's akin to finding the best athealte and trusting that you could help them be an all-star on your team.

 

Take me for example: I'm 42 and spent most of my adult life doing research and development for a company that makes car paint, I also am in the Screen Actors Guild and an Owner of an improv theater. Using the traditional hiring methods a company wouldn't look twice at me but they'd be missing out on someone with a metric ton of analitical thinking, a heap of showmanship, an overflow of loving life, a cavalade of creativity and a pinch of modesty.

 

I do not currently work for them, but reading this article makes me want to.

Chris DiAngelo

 

 
vnewman2
100%
0%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/19/2016 | 4:41:47 PM
Re: Adding to the problem
@Joe - Oh come now - it used to be (and still can be) a valid means to showcase your writing/grammar/proofreading/communications skills.  Ever see a resume with a dozen typos or misspellings?  Or one that looks like a 3 year-old wrote it?  Do you want to hire that person even if they can "do" the job - if we are talking about technology jobs, communication skills are key.  Resume writing has become a "basic" communication skill. 

You doth protest too much, methinks
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
Commentary
What Becomes of CFOs During Digital Transformation?
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  2/4/2020
News
Fighting the Coronavirus with Analytics and GIS
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  2/3/2020
Slideshows
IT Careers: 10 Job Skills in High Demand This Year
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  2/3/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
IT 2020: A Look Ahead
Are you ready for the critical changes that will occur in 2020? We've compiled editor insights from the best of our network (Dark Reading, Data Center Knowledge, InformationWeek, ITPro Today and Network Computing) to deliver to you a look at the trends, technologies, and threats that are emerging in the coming year. Download it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll