Healthcare Dives Into Big Data - InformationWeek

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5/14/2014
07:00 AM
Alison Diana
Alison Diana
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Healthcare Dives Into Big Data

Healthcare organizations hope big data and analytics projects can help reduce costs and improve care. Consider these innovative examples.
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Jersey City Medical EMS and Bradshaw Consulting Services Since deploying the Mobile Area Routing and Vehicle Location Information System (MARVLIS) to help manage about 90,000 calls annually, Jersey City Medical Emergency Medical Services (EMS) improved response rates to less than six minutes, compared with the national standard of eight minutes and 59 seconds. Fewer minutes save lives: Today, half the patients who suffer a cardiac arrest regain a pulse, AllAnalytics reported. Before MARVLIS, only one in five did so.
The system melds geographic information system technology, wireless communications, and a global positioning system to give the EMS real-time information that allows teams to arrive at their destinations more quickly. The EMS can position teams where they're most likely to be needed, based on real-time analytics. For example, MARVLIS taught Jersey City EMS that more night calls come from residential neighborhoods, and that business areas require more services during the day, enabling the service to position ambulances closer to where they would be needed. 

(Source: Jersey City Medical EMS)

Jersey City Medical EMS and Bradshaw Consulting Services
Since deploying the Mobile Area Routing and Vehicle Location Information System (MARVLIS) to help manage about 90,000 calls annually, Jersey City Medical Emergency Medical Services (EMS) improved response rates to less than six minutes, compared with the national standard of eight minutes and 59 seconds. Fewer minutes save lives: Today, half the patients who suffer a cardiac arrest regain a pulse, AllAnalytics reported. Before MARVLIS, only one in five did so.

The system melds geographic information system technology, wireless communications, and a global positioning system to give the EMS real-time information that allows teams to arrive at their destinations more quickly. The EMS can position teams where they're most likely to be needed, based on real-time analytics. For example, MARVLIS taught Jersey City EMS that more night calls come from residential neighborhoods, and that business areas require more services during the day, enabling the service to position ambulances closer to where they would be needed.

(Source: Jersey City Medical EMS)

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anon3926317251
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anon3926317251,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/6/2014 | 2:54:22 PM
Re: Due North Analytics
You are so correct, the industry is definitely growing and there is a serious need. Hopefully more people start to understand and implement our software so they can help improve the healthcare industry. 
eyu906
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eyu906,
User Rank: Strategist
6/24/2014 | 2:42:45 PM
Re: Wearables for Healthcare
Hi Alison, these three companies probably were already in your list and interviewed by you. 

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/apple-google-samsung-vie-bring-050748520.html
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/19/2014 | 2:20:04 PM
Re: Big Data Strategy
Thanks for the additional information, @Jim. Doximity appears a natural fit for your business. Clinical trials increasingly use social media as part of their recruitment and identification, especially as patients become more willing to discuss their symptoms, side effects, treatments, and other topics on sites -- especially dedicated communities or health-specific platforms. Having the right tools in place to gather and analyze this wealth of information is critical, otherwise pharma and other healthcare orgs omit a huge piece of the complex puzzle -- the patient. 

Are you also incorporating medical device tracking tools like Fitbits and Jawbones into your data-capture or isn't this information your clients want/need/can use? 
Jim_Manousos
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Jim_Manousos,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/19/2014 | 1:57:18 PM
Re: Big Data Strategy
Our team already works with Doximity in the social space and we have supplied them with much of their initial data.  Most of our revenue is in the clinical trial recruitment and KOL identification spaces.  We look at healthcare as a big jig saw puzzle and have a lot of fun helping our customers putting all the pieces together.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/19/2014 | 9:36:59 AM
Re: Big Data Strategy
@Jim - Thanks for sharing your team's story. Fascinating how you've incorporate social, business, and educational connections to focus on how and why clinicans practice in the way they do. I'm really interested, too, into your inclusion of social media, specifically providers' tweets and blogs. Are you also looking to partner with some of the healthcare-specific social media sites?

Sounds as though one way in which you separate yourself from competitors is by how 'clean' your data is. I'd think, too, with the inclusion of social and the ability to provide big data analytics you're also differentiating via the breadth, depth of data? What other ways do organizations like yours compete, especially as this is such a hugely attractive market for investors and entrepreneurs right now! 
Jim_Manousos
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Jim_Manousos,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/18/2014 | 9:17:15 PM
Re: Big Data Strategy
Allison, There are a lot of data out there.  My team processes over 1.5 billion medical claims annually into our warehouse and then blends it with 30 years of social, business and educational connections to fingerprint healthcare providers.  It not only allows you to understand how they practice and the type of patients they treat but it allows you to understand why they treat the way they do and who influenced them to treat that way.  This allows identifying outbreaks of anything on a daily basis, patient's diagnosis with a rare disease for trial recruitment and so many other issues that the uses are endless.  Since all the data is HIPAA compliant, there are never any issues.  The more people that learn to utilize these data the better.  This will save untold lives.

Our data is cleaner than the other data you have mentioned since it we standardize and uniquely identify all physicians as the records flow through our process.  We are just starting to delve into the tweets and blogs of physicians and combing through the text to pull those gems out.  I am sure this will be much more of a challenge.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/16/2014 | 9:05:46 AM
Re: Wearables for Healthcare
Thanks for the suggestion, @eyu906. I've just started working on a piece on that topic: Over the next week or so, I'll be interviewing execs about the opportunities and challenges wearables create for healthcare providers, insurers, et al, in terms of data. Obviously, these devices generate a LOT of information -- info that could be incredibly useful -- but that's also incredibly time-consuming unless organizations figure out efficient, automated ways to analyze it and discover actionable nuggets. So please keep visiting InformationWeek.com to look for this story later in May.

What other information do you want to see from a story like this?
eyu906
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eyu906,
User Rank: Strategist
5/15/2014 | 8:28:29 PM
Wearables for Healthcare
Hi Alison Diana, any info on wearables leveraging big data for healthcare?
HM
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HM,
User Rank: Moderator
5/15/2014 | 9:43:12 AM
Re: Big Data Strategy
Alison, thanks! If you would like more information or a briefing on what LexisNexis's HPCC Systems has to offer please feel free to let me know. I'd be happy to share!
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/14/2014 | 5:07:13 PM
Re: Big Data Strategy
Thanks for sharing LexisNexis' experience in analytics within healthcare. I had not realized the extent to which this company was involved in healthcare although I knew, of course, LexisNexis was heavily involved in analytics and big data work. When organizations discover savings and reduce fraud, waste, theft, and abuse, the entire system benefits. 
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