10 Healthcare Wearables, Devices Dominating CES - InformationWeek

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1/7/2016
07:05 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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10 Healthcare Wearables, Devices Dominating CES

This year's wearables go beyond basic step counting to measure core health data such as blood pressure, vision quality, and body temperature. At CES 2016, InformationWeek got up close and personal with the latest wave of health-centric devices.
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Omron
Omron's wristband looks like a bulky fitness tracker, but it's not there to count steps. The Project Zero wrist-worn health wearable is a subtle and clinically accurate blood pressure monitor (BPM) that provides real-time blood pressure readings. Its purpose is to help patients with chronic illness better record and manage their health data. The wristband also collects data like steps, calories burned, and sleep quality, to give patients a better picture of their health.
Omron also showed its Project Zero monitor for the upper arm, which measures heartbeat and hypertension. It incorporates five times more health points than earlier models, so users can get on-the-go blood pressure data without dealing with tubes and wires. The wristband and armband will project the user's data to the Omron Connect mobile app, and are slated to launch later this year for $200 and $100, respectively.

Omron

Omron's wristband looks like a bulky fitness tracker, but it's not there to count steps. The Project Zero wrist-worn health wearable is a subtle and clinically accurate blood pressure monitor (BPM) that provides real-time blood pressure readings. Its purpose is to help patients with chronic illness better record and manage their health data. The wristband also collects data like steps, calories burned, and sleep quality, to give patients a better picture of their health.

Omron also showed its Project Zero monitor for the upper arm, which measures heartbeat and hypertension. It incorporates five times more health points than earlier models, so users can get on-the-go blood pressure data without dealing with tubes and wires. The wristband and armband will project the user's data to the Omron Connect mobile app, and are slated to launch later this year for $200 and $100, respectively.

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