10 Healthcare Wearables, Devices Dominating CES - InformationWeek

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1/7/2016
07:05 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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10 Healthcare Wearables, Devices Dominating CES

This year's wearables go beyond basic step counting to measure core health data such as blood pressure, vision quality, and body temperature. At CES 2016, InformationWeek got up close and personal with the latest wave of health-centric devices.
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Omron
Omron's wristband looks like a bulky fitness tracker, but it's not there to count steps. The Project Zero wrist-worn health wearable is a subtle and clinically accurate blood pressure monitor (BPM) that provides real-time blood pressure readings. Its purpose is to help patients with chronic illness better record and manage their health data. The wristband also collects data like steps, calories burned, and sleep quality, to give patients a better picture of their health.
Omron also showed its Project Zero monitor for the upper arm, which measures heartbeat and hypertension. It incorporates five times more health points than earlier models, so users can get on-the-go blood pressure data without dealing with tubes and wires. The wristband and armband will project the user's data to the Omron Connect mobile app, and are slated to launch later this year for $200 and $100, respectively.

Omron

Omron's wristband looks like a bulky fitness tracker, but it's not there to count steps. The Project Zero wrist-worn health wearable is a subtle and clinically accurate blood pressure monitor (BPM) that provides real-time blood pressure readings. Its purpose is to help patients with chronic illness better record and manage their health data. The wristband also collects data like steps, calories burned, and sleep quality, to give patients a better picture of their health.

Omron also showed its Project Zero monitor for the upper arm, which measures heartbeat and hypertension. It incorporates five times more health points than earlier models, so users can get on-the-go blood pressure data without dealing with tubes and wires. The wristband and armband will project the user's data to the Omron Connect mobile app, and are slated to launch later this year for $200 and $100, respectively.

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surya kumar
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surya kumar,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/7/2017 | 4:12:33 AM
Re: welcome to future
I know that finding the right healthcare wearable is a struggle. Sometimes technology in itself does not provide much help. For example, Wearable marketplace has so many devices, it makes even harder to choose. Also, there are many problems you might encounter. A bunch of technological problems might arise: the device requires constant attention, needs to be charged constantly, Bluetooth connections unpair randomly and synchronization might be a nightmare. But Some makers of healthcare wearables are better than others at providing insight into how to live better instead of dumping meaningless data in the users' lap.
You surely know from the tale of Sleeping Beauty that the survival of empires could depend on a good night's sleep. Research shows sleep is very important to brainpower, health, beauty or overall well-being. Sleep trackers usually measure when you fall asleep, wake up and how much time you spend in deep-sleep.

 
AnnaK746
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AnnaK746,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/6/2017 | 7:29:58 AM
healthcare apps
It's great, I also think that this technology can help people with chronic diseases. And it's great to have a gadget that will tell you when something is wrong with your health. People don't have time to go to the doctors and they often don't pay attention to the first disease symptoms. Now a lot of people use smart devices that would monitor their health someone use similar applications https://itechcraft.com/custom-healthcare-solutions/ . Doctors use their social network. I hope in future we will have a large variety of different applications
nomii
50%
50%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
1/9/2016 | 9:38:29 AM
welcome to future

I am really surprised to know all that wearable . I think all are good additions and will help one person or the other. As a personal  favourite I will go for omron. A real nice gadget  indeed.

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